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Stress, inflammation, and cellular vulnerability during early stages of affective disorders: biomarker strategies and opportunities for prevention and intervention

Walker, Adam J., Kim, Yesul, Price, J. Blair, Kale, Rajas P., McGillivray, Jane A., Berk, Michael and Tye, Susannah J. 2014, Stress, inflammation, and cellular vulnerability during early stages of affective disorders: biomarker strategies and opportunities for prevention and intervention, Frontiers in psychiatry, vol. 5, no. 34, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.3389/fpsyt.2014.00034.

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Title Stress, inflammation, and cellular vulnerability during early stages of affective disorders: biomarker strategies and opportunities for prevention and intervention
Author(s) Walker, Adam J.
Kim, Yesul
Price, J. Blair
Kale, Rajas P.
McGillivray, Jane A.ORCID iD for McGillivray, Jane A. orcid.org/0000-0003-2000-6488
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Tye, Susannah J.
Journal name Frontiers in psychiatry
Volume number 5
Issue number 34
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1664-0640
Keyword(s) prodrome
depression
bipolar
biomarker
stress
inflammation
cellular resilience
plasticity
Summary The mood disorder prodrome is conceptualized as a symptomatic, but not yet clinically diagnosable stage of an affective disorder. Although a growing area, more focused research is needed in the pediatric population to better characterize psychopathological symptoms and biological markers that can reliably identify this very early stage in the evolution of mood disorder pathology. Such information will facilitate early prevention and intervention, which has the potential to affect a person’s disease course.This review focuses on the prodromal characteristics, risk factors, and neurobiological mechanisms of mood disorders. In particular, we consider the influence of early-life stress, inflammation, and allostatic load in mediating neural mechanisms of neuroprogression. These inherently modifiable factors have known neuroadaptive and neurodegenerative implications, and consequently may provide useful biomarker targets. Identification of these factors early in the course of the disease will accordingly allow for the introduction of early interventions which augment an individual’s capacity for psychological resilience through maintenance of synaptic integrity and cellular resilience. A targeted and complementary approach to boosting both psychological and physiological resilience simultaneously during the prodromal stage of mood disorder pathology has the greatest promise for optimizing the neurodevelopmental potential of those individuals at risk of disabling mood disorders.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2014.00034
Field of Research 170101 Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology, Psychopharmacology, Physiological Psychology)
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Frontiers Research Foundation
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062484

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.