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Bisphenol A induces otolith malformations during vertebrate embryogenesis

Gibert, Yann, Sassi-Messai, Sana, Fini, Jean-Baptiste, Bernard, Laure, Zalko, Daniel, Cravedi, Jean-Pierre, Balaguer, Patrick, Andersson-Lendhal, Monika, Demeneix, Barbara and Laudet, Vincent 2011, Bisphenol A induces otolith malformations during vertebrate embryogenesis, BMC developmental biology, vol. 11, pp. 1-17, doi: 10.1186/1471-213X-11-4.

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Title Bisphenol A induces otolith malformations during vertebrate embryogenesis
Author(s) Gibert, Yann
Sassi-Messai, Sana
Fini, Jean-Baptiste
Bernard, Laure
Zalko, Daniel
Cravedi, Jean-Pierre
Balaguer, Patrick
Andersson-Lendhal, Monika
Demeneix, Barbara
Laudet, Vincent
Journal name BMC developmental biology
Volume number 11
Article ID 4
Start page 1
End page 17
Total pages 17
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1471-213X
Keyword(s) bisphenol A (BPA)
endocrine disruptor
developmental and reproductive processes
estrogen and thyroid hormone signaling
embryonic development
zebrafish
malformations of the otic vesicle
otoliths
Summary Background
The plastic monomer and plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA), used for manufacturing polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, is produced at over 2.5 million metric tons per year. Concerns have been raised that BPA acts as an endocrine disruptor on both developmental and reproductive processes and a large body of evidence suggests that BPA interferes with estrogen and thyroid hormone signaling. Here, we investigated BPA effects during embryonic development using the zebrafish and Xenopus models.

Results
We report that BPA exposure leads to severe malformations of the otic vesicle. In zebrafish and in Xenopus embryos, exposure to BPA during the first developmental day resulted in dose-dependent defects in otolith formation. Defects included aggregation, multiplication and occasionally failure to form otoliths. As no effects on otolith development were seen with exposure to micromolar concentrations of thyroid hormone, 17-ß-estradiol or of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 we conclude that the effects of BPA are independent of estrogen receptors or thyroid-hormone receptors. Na+/K+ ATPases are crucial for otolith formation in zebrafish. Pharmacological inhibition of the major Na+/K+ ATPase with ouabain can rescue the BPA-induced otolith phenotype.

Conclusions
The data suggest that the spectrum of BPA action is wider than previously expected and argue for a systematic survey of the developmental effects of this endocrine disruptor.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-213X-11-4
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062866

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.