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Experimental study of dynamic compressive behaviour of concrete material reinforced with spiral steel fibres

Hao, Y. F., Hao, H. and Wang, Ying 2013, Experimental study of dynamic compressive behaviour of concrete material reinforced with spiral steel fibres, in SI13 : Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Shock & Impact Loads on Structures 2013, [Conference Secretariat], [Singapore], pp. 343-352.

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Title Experimental study of dynamic compressive behaviour of concrete material reinforced with spiral steel fibres
Author(s) Hao, Y. F.
Hao, H.
Wang, Ying
Conference name Shock & Impact Loads on Structures. Conference (10th : 2013 : Singapore)
Conference location Singapore
Conference dates 25-26 Nov. 2013
Title of proceedings SI13 : Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Shock & Impact Loads on Structures 2013
Editor(s) Lok, Tat Seng
Carper, E. K. L.
Publication date 2013
Conference series Shock & Impact Loads on Structures Conference Series
Start page 343
End page 352
Total pages 10
Publisher [Conference Secretariat]
Place of publication [Singapore]
Keyword(s) spiral fibre
steel fibre reinforced concrete
dynamic compression
SHPB
Summary It has been well demonstrated that the impact loading resistance capacity of the concrete material can be effectively increased by adding fibres. Recent studies proved that compared to other conventional steel fibres, using steel fibres with spiral shape further increases the post-failure energy absorption and crack stopping capacities of concrete because of the better bonds in the concrete matrix and larger deformation ability. The present study conducts high rate impact tests using split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to further investigate the dynamic compressive properties of spiral fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC). SFRC specimens with different volume fractions of fibres ranging from zero to 1.5% are prepared and tested. The influences of different volume fractions of fibres on strength, stress-strain relation and energy absorption of SFRC specimens under quasi-static and dynamic loadings are studied. In SHPB compression tests, the strain rate achieved ranges from 50 1/s to 200 1/s. Highspeed camera is used to capture the failure processes and failure modes of SFRC specimens with different fibre volume fractions during the tests for comparison. Dynamic stress-strain curves under different strain rates are derived. The energy absorption capacities of the tested specimens are obtained and compared. Strain rate effects on the compressive strength are also discussed. The corresponding empirical DIF (dynamic increase factor) relations for SFRC are proposed.
ISBN 9789810760694
Language eng
Field of Research 090506 Structural Engineering
Socio Economic Objective 870501 Civil Building Management and Services
HERDC Research category E1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2013, Shock & Impact Loads on Structures Conference
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30062900

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.