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Facilitating the highly bonded cohort : should more be done to anticipate and reduce the potential for hyper-cohesiveness and deindividuation in therapy training cohorts in universities?

Edwards, Jane 2014, Facilitating the highly bonded cohort : should more be done to anticipate and reduce the potential for hyper-cohesiveness and deindividuation in therapy training cohorts in universities?, European journal of psychotherapy and counselling, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 114-126, doi: 10.1080/13642537.2014.895770.

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Title Facilitating the highly bonded cohort : should more be done to anticipate and reduce the potential for hyper-cohesiveness and deindividuation in therapy training cohorts in universities?
Author(s) Edwards, Jane
Journal name European journal of psychotherapy and counselling
Volume number 16
Issue number 2
Start page 114
End page 126
Total pages 13
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1364-2537
1469-5901
Keyword(s) cohort dynamics
psychotherapy training difficulties
therapist trainee difficulties
therapy training
Summary Successfully facilitating learning for small therapy training programmes requires a special understanding of the psychological work of group processes. Students in therapy training spend almost every class together over two or more years. In these student groups, or cohorts, individuals manage themselves within a unique interpersonal and intragroup dynamic. Course instructors must develop their capacity to work effectively with this specific learning milieu. At the same time, the particular dynamics of the cohort context might not be understood by university management where increasingly few cohort contexts exist for students. Consequently, phenomena arising from the specialised nature of the group environment may not be well understood outside of the expertise of the course. In the first part of the paper, the international literature about learning in cohorts is reviewed. In the second part, this reflection is further developed to explore facilitation of a group that has some features of what might be described as negative cohesiveness, or what is described in family theory as enmeshment. Some consideration as to how to anticipate and off-set potential difficulties for groups in therapy training courses is also contributed.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/13642537.2014.895770
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063080

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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