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O where are you going? O do you imagine? Reproduction and response : a reflexive sociology of scholarship of teaching and learning in practical legal training

Greaves, Kristoffer 2014, O where are you going? O do you imagine? Reproduction and response : a reflexive sociology of scholarship of teaching and learning in practical legal training, in ALT 2014 : Responding to change : Proceedings of the Association of Law Teachers Annual Conference, Association of Law Teachers, London, England, pp. 1-39.

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Title O where are you going? O do you imagine? Reproduction and response : a reflexive sociology of scholarship of teaching and learning in practical legal training
Author(s) Greaves, Kristoffer
Conference name Association of Law Teachers Conference (49th : 2014 : Leeds, England)
Conference location Leeds, England
Conference dates 13 - 15 Apr. 2014
Title of proceedings ALT 2014 : Responding to change : Proceedings of the Association of Law Teachers Annual Conference
Editor(s) Huxley-Binns, Rebecca
Publication date 2014
Conference series Association of Law Teachers Conference
Start page 1
End page 39
Total pages 39
Publisher Association of Law Teachers
Place of publication London, England
Keyword(s) practical legal training
professional legal education
legal education
sociology of law
practice research
sociology of education
scholarship of teaching and learning
practical legal training practitioners
Summary My doctoral research studies Australian PLT practitioners’ engagement with scholarship of teaching and learning. I argue that many PLT practitioners are motivated to engage with scholarship of teaching and learning in their work. There are, however, individual and extra-individual impediments.
PLT practitioners are lawyers that teach in institutional practical legal training (“PLT”). Satisfactory completion of mandatory PLT is an eligibility requirement for admission to the Australian legal profession. The PLT requirement is additional to academic legal qualifications. PLT is undertaken at a post-graduate level with, or after, the academic law degree.
My study investigates PLT practitioners’ motivations and capabilities to engage with scholarship of teaching and learning (“SoTL”). I study organisational symbolic support for SoTL in PLT, and organisational allocation of resources to SoTL in PLT.
The study involves individual and extra-individual domains of PLT practitioners’ work. It considers how social structures (e.g. “the juridical”) are inscribed into individuals’ practices (“teaching”) and, conversely, whether practices influence social structures.
My research adopts qualitative methodologies. These involve inter-disciplinary exchanges between law, legal education, practice research, sociology of law, cultural theory, and theory and practice of teaching and learning. My theoretical framework draws on Pierre Bourdieu’s “reflexive sociology”, and Michel de Certeau’s “heterological science”.
I sourced data from documents, and semi-structured interviews with 36 Australian PLT practitioners. Documentary sources include statutory instruments, speeches, reports, practice directions, histories, and scholarly publications.
To analyse the data I adopted Kelle’s characterisation of “theoretical sensitivity”, drawing on “explicit” and “emergent” analysis strategies derived from “grounded theory”. The explicit strategies were based on my theoretical framework. The emergent strategy involved sensitivity to non-explicit concepts and theories that emerged from the data. Computer-aided qualitative data analysis software expedited these methods.
My findings to date question dominant legal structures’ readiness for change, the implications of this for teaching and learning in PLT, and in particular for PLT practitioners’ engagement with SoTL in PLT.
The espoused rationale for mandatory PLT (in statutes) is improvement for the protection of clients, the administration of justice, and to assure quality legal services. The tacit rationale is improved quality of legal education, and experiences, for lawyers-to-be. My thesis argues dominant structures in legal education impede the espoused and tacit objectives, and impede PLT practitioners’ engagement with scholarship of teaching and learning.
Notes Working papers series
Language eng
Field of Research 180199 Law not elsewhere classified
130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators
130199 Education systems not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970118 Expanding Knowledge in Law and Legal Studies
HERDC Research category EN Other conference paper
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063183

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Education
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Created: Sun, 11 May 2014, 11:15:33 EST by Kristoffer Greaves

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