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Mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms amongst disadvantaged women

Teychenne, Megan, Torres, Susan, McNaughton, Sarah A., Salmon, Jo and Ball, Kylie 2014, Mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms amongst disadvantaged women, Mental health and physical activity, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 30-36.

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Title Mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms amongst disadvantaged women
Author(s) Teychenne, MeganORCID iD for Teychenne, Megan orcid.org/0000-0002-7293-8255
Torres, SusanORCID iD for Torres, Susan orcid.org/0000-0002-2599-1934
McNaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Journal name Mental health and physical activity
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Start page 30
End page 36
Total pages 7
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014-03
ISSN 1755-2966
1878-0199
Keyword(s) sitting time
television viewing
depression
mental health
socio-economic disadvantage
Summary Statement of problem
Associations between sedentary behavior (e.g. time spent sitting watching TV/using the computer) and physical health have been well documented, however, studies are increasingly reporting a positive relationship between certain sedentary behaviors and poor mental health (e.g. depression). Little is known about the underlying factors that may explain the link between sedentary behavior and likelihood of depression. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contribution of selected intra-personal and social factors as potential mediators of the relationship between sedentary behavior and depressive symptoms among women from disadvantaged neighborhoods.
Method
Cross-sectional survey data were provided by 4065 women (aged 18–45) living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Women self-reported their sedentary behavior (total sitting time and screen time), depressive symptoms (CES-D 10), as well as a number of intra-personal (leisure-time physical activity, diet quality, weight status) and social (social cohesion, interpersonal trust, club membership) factors.
Results
Mediating analyses, controlling for confounders, showed that women's leisure-time physical activity partly mediated the relationship between total sitting time and increased likelihood of depressive symptoms. Women's diet quality, and social cohesion partly mediated the relationship between screen time and increased likelihood of depressive symptoms.
Conclusions
Acknowledging the cross-sectional study design, findings suggest that there may be several factors that explain the increased likelihood of depressive symptoms associated with greater sedentary time. Although future studies should test the mediating relationships longitudinally, these findings may help inform interventions aimed at reducing the likelihood of depression in disadvantaged women with high sitting time.
Language eng
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063286

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.