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A longitudinal study of quality of life among people living with a progressive neurological illness

McCabe, Marita and O'Connor, Elodie 2013, A longitudinal study of quality of life among people living with a progressive neurological illness, Health, vol. 5, no. 6A2, pp. 17-23, doi: 10.4236/health.2013.56A2004.

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Title A longitudinal study of quality of life among people living with a progressive neurological illness
Author(s) McCabe, Marita
O'Connor, Elodie
Journal name Health
Volume number 5
Issue number 6A2
Start page 17
End page 23
Total pages 7
Publisher Scientific Research
Place of publication Irvine, CA
Publication date 2013-06
ISSN 1949-4998
Keyword(s) quality of life
neurological illness
mood
social support
Summary This study investigated predictors of quality of life (QOL) of people with progressive neurological illnesses. Participants were 257 people with motor neurone disease (MND), Huntington’s disease (HD), multiple sclerosis (MS), or Parkinson’s. Participants completed questionnaires on two occasions, 12 months apart. There was an increase in severity of symptoms for people withMND, negative mood for people with HD and Parkinson’s, and social support satisfaction for people with MS. Regression analyses were conducted to determine predictors of QOL for each group. Predictor variables were length of illness, symptoms (physical symptoms, control over body, cognitive symptoms and psychological symptoms), mood, relationship satisfaction and social support. Predictors of QOL were severity of symptoms for people withMND, HD and MS; negative mood for people withMNDand Parkinson’s; and social support satisfaction for people with MS. These results demonstrate the importance of illness severity and mood in predicting QOL, but also indicate differences between illness groups. The limited role played by social support and relationship is a surprising finding from the current study.
Language eng
DOI 10.4236/health.2013.56A2004
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 920413 Social Structure and Health
HERDC Research category C3 Non-refereed articles in a professional journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Scientific Research
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063399

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.