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Empowering the smart grid : can redox batteries be matched to renewable energy systems for energy storage?

Halls, Jonathan E., Hawthornthwaite, Amanda, Hepworth, Russell J., Roberts, Noel A., Wright, Kevin J., Zhou, Yan, Haswell, Stephen J., Haywood, Stephanie K., Kelly, Stephen M., Lawrence, Nathan S. and Wadhawan, Jay D. 2013, Empowering the smart grid : can redox batteries be matched to renewable energy systems for energy storage?, Energy and environmental science, vol. 6, no. 3, pp. 1026-1041, doi: 10.1039/c3ee23708g.

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Title Empowering the smart grid : can redox batteries be matched to renewable energy systems for energy storage?
Author(s) Halls, Jonathan E.
Hawthornthwaite, Amanda
Hepworth, Russell J.
Roberts, Noel A.
Wright, Kevin J.
Zhou, Yan
Haswell, Stephen J.
Haywood, Stephanie K.
Kelly, Stephen M.
Lawrence, Nathan S.
Wadhawan, Jay D.
Journal name Energy and environmental science
Volume number 6
Issue number 3
Start page 1026
End page 1041
Total pages 16
Publisher Royal Society of Chemistry
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1754-5692
1754-5706
Summary The charging of an undivided cerium–zinc redox battery by various current waveforms some of which mimic the output of renewable energy (solar, wind, tidal, biofuel burning) to electricity transducers is considered in this work, where the battery operates through diffusion-only conditions, and is discharged galvanostatically. Under reasonable assumption, the mathematical model developed enables the observation that the performance characteristic of the cells charged with a constant power input differentiates between the various current–charge waveforms, with cell geometry and electrode kinetics playing subtle, but significant, roles; in particular, high efficiency is observed for sunlight-charged batteries which are thin and suffer no corrosion of the sacrificial electrode, and which have already experienced a charge–discharge cycle. The performance characteristics of the systems are interpreted in the light of consequences for smart grid realisation, and indicate that, for a constant power input, the most matched renewable is biofuel burning with a current output that linearly increases with time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1039/c3ee23708g
Field of Research 090703 Environmental Technologies
Socio Economic Objective 850599 Renewable Energy not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Royal Society of Chemistry
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063527

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.