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Development of microfluidic-based analytical methodology for studying the effects of chemotherapy agents on cancer tissue

Sylvester, Deborah, Hattersley, Samantha M., Stafford, Nicholas D., Haswell, Stephen J. and Greenman, John 2013, Development of microfluidic-based analytical methodology for studying the effects of chemotherapy agents on cancer tissue, Current analytical chemistry, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 2-8, doi: 10.2174/1573411011309010002.

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Title Development of microfluidic-based analytical methodology for studying the effects of chemotherapy agents on cancer tissue
Author(s) Sylvester, Deborah
Hattersley, Samantha M.
Stafford, Nicholas D.
Haswell, Stephen J.
Greenman, John
Journal name Current analytical chemistry
Volume number 9
Issue number 1
Start page 2
End page 8
Total pages 7
Publisher Bentham Science Publishers
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1573-4110
1875-6727
Keyword(s) 5-flurouracil
Cisplatin
Docetaxel
Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
Lactate dehydrogenase
Microfluidics
Tumour microenvironment
Summary Whilst a multitude of techniques have been employed to study the biology of tumour tissue and its response to chemotherapeutic reagents, most current methodologies do not capture the sophistication of the in vivo environment. Microfluidics however offers the ability to maintain and interrogate primary tissue samples in an environment with biomimetic flow characteristics. In this study head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) tumour biopsies have been used to investigate the performance of a microfluidic device for generating clinically-useful information. The response of fresh and cryogenically-frozen primary HNSCC or metastatic lymph node samples to chemotherapy drugs (cisplatin, 5-flurouracil or docetaxel), alone and in combination, were monitored for both proliferation (water-soluble tetrazolium salt metabolism) and cell death biomarker release (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH) “off-chip”. The frozen tissue showed no significant difference in terms of either proliferation or LDH release in comparison with the matched fresh samples. Administration of all drugs caused cell death, in a dose-response manner, with the combination showing the greatest amount of cytotoxicity particularly at days 8 and 9; correlating well with published clinical data. The system described here offers an innovative method for studying the tumour microenvironment in vitro and, through incorporation of relevant analytical modules, provides the basis of a pre-clinical device that can be used to define personalised treatment regimens.
Language eng
DOI 10.2174/1573411011309010002
Field of Research 111205 Chemotherapy
Socio Economic Objective 920102 Cancer and Related Disorders
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Bentham Science Publishers
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063529

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
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