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Screening for resistance to potato cyst nematode in Australian potato cultivars and alternative solanaceous hosts

Faggian, R., Powell, A. and Slater, A.T. 2012, Screening for resistance to potato cyst nematode in Australian potato cultivars and alternative solanaceous hosts, Australasian plant pathology, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 453-461, doi: 10.1007/s13313-011-0098-y.

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Title Screening for resistance to potato cyst nematode in Australian potato cultivars and alternative solanaceous hosts
Author(s) Faggian, R.ORCID iD for Faggian, R. orcid.org/0000-0001-8750-3062
Powell, A.
Slater, A.T.
Journal name Australasian plant pathology
Volume number 41
Issue number 5
Start page 453
End page 461
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2012-09
ISSN 0815-3191
1448-6032
Keyword(s) PCN
Resistance
Globodera
Breeding
Potato
S. aviculare
Summary The potato cyst nematodes (PCN), Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.) and G. pallida (Stone), are major pests of ware and seed potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) crops worldwide and severely impact the movement of potatoes around the globe through quarantine restrictions. In Australia, only G. rostochiensis has been discovered, on four separate occasions between 1986 and 2008. The infested areas are the subject of strict regulation and quarantine procedures and while they are considered to be contained, managing nematode populations remains a priority. This study has identified the G. rostochiensis Ro1 resistance-status of potato cultivars currently grown by Australian potato growers, and new cultivars emerging from the Australian Potato Breeding Program. Resistance was assessed by a simple and robust procedure carried out in a purpose-built quarantine facility. Of the 24 potato cultivars grown in the affected Koo Wee Rup district in 2004, 10 were resistant to nematode infestation, including the locally important cultivar Atlantic. Other cultivars important to the Victorian and Australian potato industry, such as Kennebec, Desiree, Sebago and Coliban, were classified as susceptible. Importantly, this study provided evidence that the Koo Wee Rup PCN population was able to complete its lifecycle on the native plant species, S. aviculare (kangaroo apple), potentially acting as an alternate host and spreading PCN among potato crops.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s13313-011-0098-y
Field of Research 049999 Earth Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2012, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063568

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research
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