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Creativity and education :teaching the unfamiliar

Pollard, Vikki 2012, Creativity and education :teaching the unfamiliar, in The Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and Asia-Pacific Education Research Association Conference World Education Research Association Focal Meeting, [The Conference], Sydney, NSW, pp. 1-8.

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Title Creativity and education :teaching the unfamiliar
Author(s) Pollard, VikkiORCID iD for Pollard, Vikki orcid.org/0000-0002-2209-1199
Conference name Australian Association for Research in Education and the Asia Pacific Educational Research Association. Combined Conference (2012 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 3-6 Dec. 2012
Title of proceedings The Joint Australian Association for Research in Education and Asia-Pacific Education Research Association Conference World Education Research Association Focal Meeting
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2012
Conference series Australian Association for Research in Education and the Asia Pacific Educational Research Association Combined Conference
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher [The Conference]
Place of publication Sydney, NSW
Keyword(s) creativity
creative education
teaching creativity
Summary The development of capacities of creativity has long been important in creative arts education (Morgan, 2012) and is increasingly becoming important to other fields in higher education (McWilliam and Haukka, 2008, Csikszentmihalyi, 2006, Edward, McGoldrick & Oliver, 2006). To develop such capabilities at least two factors need to be addressed: defining 'creativity' and thinking about how to teach it. This paper has two aims; firstly to consider the idea that creativity is a process (Morgan, 2012) of changing habits (Koestler, 1964, McWilliam and Sandra Haukka, 2008) that is inherently traumatic (Peirce, 1940) because it involves taking risks with habits which have previously proven useful and comforting. The centrality of trauma and risk raises concerns if creativity is to become a standard graduate attribute; concerns for students asked to take risk and the concern that the university is traditionally adverse to risk-taking. Secondly, a technique for teaching how to be creative derived from Russian Formalism is considered. Ostranenie, or making strange might be deployed with the aim of teaching students a technique for habit breaking
Language eng
Field of Research 169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970116 Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2012, Australian Association for Research in Education and the Asia Pacific Educational Research Association
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063704

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.