Detecting the impact of invasive species on native fauna: Cane toads (Bufo marinus), frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) and the importance of spatial replication

Ujvari, Beata, Shine, Richard and Madsen, Thomas 2010, Detecting the impact of invasive species on native fauna: Cane toads (Bufo marinus), frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) and the importance of spatial replication, Australian ecology, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 126-130, doi: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02126.x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Detecting the impact of invasive species on native fauna: Cane toads (Bufo marinus), frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) and the importance of spatial replication
Author(s) Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Shine, Richard
Madsen, Thomas
Journal name Australian ecology
Volume number 36
Issue number 2
Start page 126
End page 130
Total pages 5
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2010
ISSN 1442-9993
Keyword(s) cane toad
ecological impact
frillneck lizard
invasive species
replication
Summary An understanding of which native species are severely impacted by an anthropogenic change (such as the arrival of an invasive species) and which are not is critical to prioritizing conservation efforts. However, it is difficult to detect such impacts if the native taxa exhibit strong stochastic variations in abundance; a ‘natural’ population decline might be wrongly interpreted as an impact of the invader. Frillneck lizards (Chlamydosaurus kingii) are large iconic Australian agamids, and have been reported to decline following the invasion of toxic cane toads. We monitored three populations of the species in the savanna woodland of tropical Australia over a 7-year period bracketing toad arrival. One population crashed, one remained stable and one increased. Hence, studies on any single population might have inferred that cane toads have negative, negligible or positive effects on frillneck lizards. With the benefit of spatial replication, and in combination with observations of prey choice by captive lizards, our data suggest that invasive cane toads have had little or no effect on frillneck abundance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02126.x
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2010, Wiley
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063811

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 344 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 02 Jun 2014, 10:09:09 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.