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Increased mortality of naive varanid lizards after the invasion of non-native can toads (bufo marinus)

Ujvari, Beata and Madsen, Thomas 2009, Increased mortality of naive varanid lizards after the invasion of non-native can toads (bufo marinus), Herpetological conservation and biology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 248-251.

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Title Increased mortality of naive varanid lizards after the invasion of non-native can toads (bufo marinus)
Author(s) Ujvari, BeataORCID iD for Ujvari, Beata orcid.org/0000-0003-2391-2988
Madsen, Thomas
Journal name Herpetological conservation and biology
Volume number 4
Issue number 2
Start page 248
End page 251
Total pages 4
Publisher Herpetological Conservation and Biology
Place of publication Texarkana, Tex.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1931-7603
Keyword(s) Goanna
Cane Toad
Varanus panoptes
Bufo marinus
mortality
Northern Territory
ecology
introduced species
Summary Exotic animal and plant species introduced into the Australian continent often imparted catastrophic effects on the indigenous fauna and flora. Proponents of biological control introduced the South American Cane Toad (Bufo marinus) into the sugar cane fields of Queensland in 1935. The Cane Toad is one of the most toxic bufonids and when seized by naive Australian predators, the toxin usually kills the attacker. One group of Australian squamate reptiles that are very susceptible to Cane Toad toxins is varanid lizards. Prior to Cane Toad invasion of our study area, the Adelaide River floodplain of the Northern Territory of Australia, annual mortality of adult male radio-tagged yellow-spotted Goannas (Varanus panoptes) was very low. After the arrival of toads in October 2005, all radio-tracked goannas were found dead in August 2006, most likely attempting to feed on the toads. Our results suggest that invasive Cane Toads place naive adult male Yellow-spotted Goannas at risk of possibly >90% mortality. This increase in mortality could reduce the genetic diversity and hamper long-term survival of these large carnivorous lizards.
Language eng
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Herpetological Conservation and Biology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30063818

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Open Access Collection
Centre for Integrative Ecology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.