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A dish-rack full of crockery : social significance and the Sydney Opera House

Garduno Freeman, Cristina 2008, A dish-rack full of crockery : social significance and the Sydney Opera House, in SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, [Geelong, Vic.], pp. 1-12.

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Title A dish-rack full of crockery : social significance and the Sydney Opera House
Author(s) Garduno Freeman, CristinaORCID iD for Garduno Freeman, Cristina orcid.org/0000-0002-6085-6340
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand. Conference (25th : 2008 : Geelong, Victoria)
Conference location Geelong, Victoria
Conference dates 3-6 Jul. 2008
Title of proceedings SAHANZ 2008 : History in practice : 25th International Conference of the Society of Architectural Historians Australia and New Zealand
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2008
Conference series Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Place of publication [Geelong, Vic.]
Summary The sculptural roof forms of the Sydney Opera House regularly attract visual analogies in the public mind. Although they are mostly referred to as a??sailsa?? or a??shellsa?? they have also been described through humorous metaphors like a??a dishrack full of crockerya??. This particular visual pun, is a reference to a linocut by Eric Thake, produced in 1972, the year before the official opening of the Sydney Opera House. This analogy and its continued popularity to date evidences the social and cultural life of this building. Much of the scholarly on the Sydney Opera House investigates the architecture and the circumstances of its realisation, whilst its reception and social significance, has received little systematic attention. Through Thakea??s linocut, the paper discusses the current limitations in evaluating social significance in an Australian heritage context and proposes an alternative perspective to this problem through two scholars who bring a??subjective experiencea?? to bear on the production of meaning. For Gillian Rose, visual artefacts become significant through their embodied experience, whilst Ann Game argues for the inclusion of such usually-excluded subjects like desire, memory, time and the body in the construction of meaning. By bringing these theories to bear on a specific example - Eric Thakea??s visual metaphor for the Sydney Opera House - the paper investigates a new approach to social significance.
ISBN 9780958192545
Language eng
Field of Research 129999 Built Environment and Design not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064231

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Architecture and Built Environment
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.