Openly accessible

Does timing matter? How priority effects influence the outcome of parasite interactions within hosts

Hoverman, Jason T., Hoye, Bethany J. and Johnson, Pieter T.J. 2013, Does timing matter? How priority effects influence the outcome of parasite interactions within hosts, Oecologia, vol. 173, no. 4, pp. 1471-1480, doi: 10.1007/s00442-013-2692-x.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Does timing matter? How priority effects influence the outcome of parasite interactions within hosts
Author(s) Hoverman, Jason T.
Hoye, Bethany J.ORCID iD for Hoye, Bethany J. orcid.org/0000-0001-9502-5582
Johnson, Pieter T.J.
Journal name Oecologia
Volume number 173
Issue number 4
Start page 1471
End page 1480
Total pages 10
Publisher Springer-Verlag
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2013-12
ISSN 0029-8549
1432-1939
Keyword(s) amphibian
coinfection
developmental windows
immune priming
indirect competition
Summary In nature, hosts are exposed to an assemblage of parasite species that collectively form a complex community within the host. To date, however, our understanding of how within-host–parasite communities assemble and interact remains limited. Using a larval amphibian host (Pacific chorus frog, Pseudacris regilla) and two common trematode parasites (Ribeiroia ondatrae and Echinostoma trivolvis), we experimentally examined how the sequence of host exposure influenced parasite interactions within hosts. While there was no evidence that the parasites interacted when hosts were exposed to both parasites simultaneously, we detected evidence of both intraspecific and interspecific competition when exposures were temporally staggered. However, the strength and outcome of these priority effects depended on the sequence of addition, even after accounting for the fact that parasites added early in host development were more likely to encyst compared to parasites added later. Ribeiroia infection success was reduced by 14 % when Echinostoma was added prior to Ribeiroia, whereas no such effect was noted for Echinostoma when Ribeiroia was added first. Using a novel fluorescent-labeling technique that allowed us to track Ribeiroia infections from different exposure events, we also discovered that, similar to the interspecific interactions, early encysting parasites reduced the encystment success of later arriving parasites by 41 %, which could be mediated by host immune responses and/or competition for space. These results suggest that parasite identity interacts with host immune responses to mediate parasite interactions within the host, such that priority effects may play an important role in structuring parasite communities within hosts. This knowledge can be used to assess host–parasite interactions within natural communities in which environmental conditions can lead to heterogeneity in the timing and composition of host exposure to parasites.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00442-013-2692-x
Field of Research 069999 Biological Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Springer
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064348

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 51 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 52 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 329 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 13 Jun 2014, 12:03:46 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.