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The Australian multiple sclerosis (MS) immunotherapy study: A prospective, multicentre study of drug utilisation using the MSBase platform

Jokubaitis, Vilija G., Spelman, Tim, Lechner-Scott, Jeannette, Barnett, Michael, Shaw, Cameron, Vucis, Steve, Liew, Danny, Butkueven, Helmut and Slee, Mark 2013, The Australian multiple sclerosis (MS) immunotherapy study: A prospective, multicentre study of drug utilisation using the MSBase platform, PLoS one, vol. 8, no. 3, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0059694.

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Title The Australian multiple sclerosis (MS) immunotherapy study: A prospective, multicentre study of drug utilisation using the MSBase platform
Author(s) Jokubaitis, Vilija G.
Spelman, Tim
Lechner-Scott, Jeannette
Barnett, Michael
Shaw, Cameron
Vucis, Steve
Liew, Danny
Butkueven, Helmut
Slee, Mark
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 8
Issue number 3
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1932-6203
Summary To prospectively characterise treatment persistence and predictors of treatment discontinuation in an Australian relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) population. Tertiary MS treatment centres participating in the MSBase registry prospectively assessed treatment utilisation, persistence, predictors of treatment discontinuation and switch rates. Multivariable survival analyses were used to compare treatment persistence between drugs and to identify predictors of treatment discontinuation. 1113 RRMS patients were studied. Patients persisted on their first disease-modifying therapy (DMT) for a median of 2.5 years. Treatment persistence on GA was shorter than on all IFNβ products (p<0.03). Younger age at treatment initiation and higher EDSS were predictive of DMT discontinuation. Patients persisted on subsequent DMTs, for 2.3 years. Patients receiving natalizumab (NAT) as a subsequent DMT persisted longer on treatment than those on IFNβ or GA (p<0.000). The primary reason for treatment discontinuation for any drug class was poor tolerability. Annualised switch or cessation rates were 9.5–12.5% for individual IFNβ products, 11.6% for GA and 4.4% for NAT. This multicentre MS cohort study is the first to directly compare treatment persistence on IFNβ and GA to NAT. We report that treatment persistence in our Australian RRMS population is short, although patients receiving IFNβ as a first DMT persisted longer on treatment than those on GA. Additionally, patients receiving NAT as a subsequent DMT were more likely to persist on treatment than those switched to IFNβ or GA. EDSS and age at DMT initiation were predictive of DMT discontinuation. Treatment intolerance was the principal reason for treatment cessation.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0059694
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2013, Public Library of Science
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064367

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.