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Eliciting personal constructs to distinguish prevailing D/discourse in police training

Ryan, Cheryl 2008, Eliciting personal constructs to distinguish prevailing D/discourse in police training, International journal of learning, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 35-46.

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Title Eliciting personal constructs to distinguish prevailing D/discourse in police training
Author(s) Ryan, Cheryl
Journal name International journal of learning
Volume number 15
Issue number 2
Start page 35
End page 46
Total pages 12
Publisher Common Ground Publishing
Place of publication Champaign, IL
Publication date 2008
ISSN 1447-9494
Keyword(s) D/discourse
police training
repertory grid technique
Summary This paper describes the application of the rank-order repertory grid technique to elicit personal constructs in order to distinguish prevailing D/discourse in police training. Traditionally, the repertory grid has been used as a quantitative method for data collection, correlation, and analysis, however, in recent years it has been applied as a qualitative method. This research combines the use of the repertory grid as a quantitative method for data collection and initial statistical analysis with a discourse analytic framework for final theoretical analysis. This research is in informed by a literature review of police culture, police training, gender, “Othering”, and inherent D/discourses in police organisations, and inspired by the researcher’s professional experiences in a police organisation. Anecdotal evidence and studies reveal that pedagogical training methods are predominantly used in police training with concerns identified as to their educative value. These concerns are supported by Australian and international studies into police management education which reveal a ‘resistant anti-intellectual subculture’ and a set of unconscious and unchallengeable assumptions regarding police work, conduct, and leadership which prevents critical thinking. An examination of D/discourse in police training is timely and pertinent given the Australasian agenda for policing to become a profession.
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Common Ground Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064546

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
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Created: Wed, 18 Jun 2014, 14:12:02 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.