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Pedagogy, police training, D/discourses – subcultures and situated identities and meanings

Ryan, Cheryl 2008, Pedagogy, police training, D/discourses – subcultures and situated identities and meanings, in TASA 2008 : Reimagining Sociology : Proceedings of the Australian Sociological Association Annual conference, Australian Sociological Association (TASA), Melbourne, Vic., pp. 1-12.

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Title Pedagogy, police training, D/discourses – subcultures and situated identities and meanings
Author(s) Ryan, Cheryl
Conference name Australian Sociological Association. Conference (2008 : Melbourne, Vic.)
Conference location Melbourne, Vic.
Conference dates 2-5 Dec. 2008
Title of proceedings TASA 2008 : Reimagining Sociology : Proceedings of the Australian Sociological Association Annual conference
Editor(s) [unknown]
Publication date 2008
Conference series Australian Sociological Association Conference
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Australian Sociological Association (TASA)
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Keyword(s) policing community
culture
subcultures
police training
D/discourses
Summary Qualitative and quantitative methods were used in this research to distinguish the prevailing D/discourses (words, tools, beliefs, thinking styles) in police training and to analyse the ‘discourse-practice’ (Cherryholmes 1988: 1) framework of policing in a training environment. The manifestations, functions and consequences of the D/discourses raise concerns about the efficacy of training (its doctrinal intent and value versus its educative intent and value) and its implications for individuals’ identity, subjectivity, agency, learning, and “membership” within the policing community. The literature revealed that police training acts as a formally sanctioned vehicle for police culture, subcultures, and D/discourses. This is complicated by (a) the predominance of pedagogical training practices that support a trainer-centred approach and standardised lecture format for training, (b) police training focusing predominantly on law enforcement at the cost of higher- rder conceptual skills, and (c) Australian and international studies of police management education which  reveal a subculture resistant to theoretical analysis and critical reflection, and a set of unconscious and unchallengeable assumptions regarding police work, conduct, and leadership. The agenda of Australian and New Zealand police services for police to become a profession provides a backdrop to this research and findings.
ISBN 9780734039842
0734039840
Language eng
Field of Research 130202 Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
Socio Economic Objective 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2008, Australian Sociological Association (TASA)
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064548

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Education
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.