Identification of mental illness in police cells: a comparison of police processes, the brief jail mental health screen and the jail screening assessment tool

Baksheev, Gennady N., Ogloff, Jim and Thomas, Stuart 2011, Identification of mental illness in police cells: a comparison of police processes, the brief jail mental health screen and the jail screening assessment tool, Psychology, crime & law, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 529-542, doi: 10.1080/1068316X.2010.510118.

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Title Identification of mental illness in police cells: a comparison of police processes, the brief jail mental health screen and the jail screening assessment tool
Author(s) Baksheev, Gennady N.
Ogloff, Jim
Thomas, Stuart
Journal name Psychology, crime & law
Volume number 18
Issue number 6
Start page 529
End page 542
Total pages 14
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011
ISSN 1477-2744
Keyword(s) screening
mental illness
police cells
BJMHS
JSAT
Summary The study investigated current police practices employed to identify those with a mental illness in police custody, and to evaluate the predictive utility of the Brief Jail Mental Health Screen (BJMHS) and the Jail Screening Assessment Tool (JSAT). One hundred and fifty detainees were recruited from two police stations in Melbourne, Australia. Measures included the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, BJMHS and JSAT. Axis-I disorders were compared with police decisions regarding identification of mental illness based on their usual practices. Participants were classified as requiring referral for further mental health evaluation according to the screening tools. Results indicated that current police practices produced high false negatives, with many of those experiencing mental illness not identified. There was no significant difference in performance between BJMHS (AUC =0.722) and JSAT (AUC =0.779) in identifying those with a serious mental illness (p=0.109). However, JSAT performed significantly better at identifying any Axis-I disorder, excluding substance use disorders, as compared with BJMHS (AUC =0.815, vs AUC =0.729; p=0.018). Given the high prevalence of mental illness among detainees, there is a pressing need to introduce standardised screening tools for mental illness in police custody. This can assist the police in managing detainees appropriately and securing mental health services as required.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/1068316X.2010.510118
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064693

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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