You are not logged in.

Psychotic-like experiences in a community sample of adolescents: implications for the continuum model of psychosis and prediction of schizophrenia

Yung, Alison R., Nelson, Barnaby, Baker, Kathryn, Buckby, Joe A., Baksheev, Gennady and Cosgrave, Elizabeth M. 2009, Psychotic-like experiences in a community sample of adolescents: implications for the continuum model of psychosis and prediction of schizophrenia, Australian & New Zealand journal of psychiatry, vol. 43, no. 2, pp. 118-128, doi: 10.1080/00048670802607188.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Psychotic-like experiences in a community sample of adolescents: implications for the continuum model of psychosis and prediction of schizophrenia
Author(s) Yung, Alison R.
Nelson, Barnaby
Baker, Kathryn
Buckby, Joe A.
Baksheev, Gennady
Cosgrave, Elizabeth M.
Journal name Australian & New Zealand journal of psychiatry
Volume number 43
Issue number 2
Start page 118
End page 128
Total pages 11
Publisher Sage
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2009
ISSN 1440-1614
Summary Studies conducted in community samples suggest that psychotic-like experiences are common in the general population, leading to suggestions that they are either variations of normal personality or are different expressions of underlying vulnerability to psychotic disorder. Different types of psychotic symptoms may exist, some being normal variants and some having implications for mental health and functioning. The aim of the present study was to determine if different subtypes of psychotic-like experiences could be identified in a community sample of adolescents and to investigate if particular subtypes were more likely to be associated with psychosocial difficulties, that is, distress, depression and poor functioning, than other subtypes. Eight hundred and seventy-five Year 10 students from 34 schools participated in a cross-sectional survey that measured psychotic-like experiences using the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences; depression using the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale; and psychosocial functioning using the Revised Multidimensional Assessment of Functioning Scale. Factor analysis was conducted to identify any subtypes of psychotic experiences. Four subtypes of psychotic-like experiences were identified: Bizarre Experiences, Perceptual Abnormalities, Persecutory Ideas, and Magical Thinking. Intermittent, infrequent psychotic experiences were common, but frequent experiences were not. Bizarre Experiences, Perceptual Abnormalities and Persecutory Ideas were strongly associated with distress, depression and poor functioning. Magical Thinking was only weakly associated with these variables. Overall these findings may suggest that infrequent psychotic-like experiences are unlikely to be a specific risk factor for onset of a psychotic disorder in community samples. Given that the different subtypes had varying associations with current difficulties it is suggested that not all subtypes confer the same risk for onset of psychotic disorder and poor outcome. Bizarre Experiences, Perceptual Abnormalities and Persecutory Ideas may represent expressions of underlying vulnerability to psychotic disorder, but Magical Thinking may be a normal personality variant.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/00048670802607188
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2009, Sage Publications
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064703

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 145 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 160 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 79 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 24 Jun 2014, 09:56:59 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.