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Determinants of the frequency of contact lens wear

Morgan, Philip B., Efron, Nathan and Woods, Craig 2013, Determinants of the frequency of contact lens wear, Eye & contact lens: Science & clinical practice, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 200-204, doi: 10.1097/ICL.0b013e31827a7ad3.

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Title Determinants of the frequency of contact lens wear
Author(s) Morgan, Philip B.
Efron, Nathan
Woods, CraigORCID iD for Woods, Craig orcid.org/0000-0002-5942-6247
Journal name Eye & contact lens: Science & clinical practice
Volume number 39
Issue number 3
Start page 200
End page 204
Total pages 5
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 1542-233X
Summary To characterize and discover the determinants of the frequency of wear (FOW) of contact lenses. Survey forms were sent to contact lens fitters in up to 40 countries between January and March every year for 5 consecutive years (2007–2011). Practitioners were asked to record data relating to the first 10 contact lens fits or refits performed after receiving the survey form. Only data for daily wear lens fits were analyzed. Data were collected in relation to 74,510 and 9,014 soft and rigid lens fits, respectively. Overall, FOW was 5.9±1.7 days per week (DPW). When considering the proportion of lenses worn between one to seven DPW, the distribution for rigid lenses is skewed toward full-time wear (7 DPW), whereas the distribution for soft daily disposable lenses is perhaps bimodal, with large and small peaks at seven and two DPW, respectively. There is a significant variation in FOW among nations (P<0.0001), ranging from 6.8±1.0 DPW in Greece to 5.1±2.5 DPW in Kuwait. For soft lenses, FOW increases with decreasing age. Females (6.0±1.6 DPW) wear lenses more frequently than males (5.8±1.7 DPW) (P=0.0002). FOW is greater among those wearing presbyopic corrections (6.1±1.4 DPW) compared with spherical (5.9±1.7 DPW) and toric (5.9±1.6 DPW) designs (P<0.0001). FOW with hydrogel peroxide systems (6.4±1.1 DPW) was greater than that with multipurpose systems (6.2±1.3 DPW) (P<0.0001).
Language eng
DOI 10.1097/ICL.0b013e31827a7ad3
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064711

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Medicine
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