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Patient engagement strategies used for hypertension and their influence on self-management attributes

McNamara, Kevin, Versace, Vincent, Marriott, Jennifer and Dunbar, James 2014, Patient engagement strategies used for hypertension and their influence on self-management attributes, Family practice, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 437-444, doi: 10.1093/fampra/cmu026.

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Title Patient engagement strategies used for hypertension and their influence on self-management attributes
Author(s) McNamara, KevinORCID iD for McNamara, Kevin orcid.org/0000-0001-6547-9153
Versace, VincentORCID iD for Versace, Vincent orcid.org/0000-0002-8514-1763
Marriott, Jennifer
Dunbar, JamesORCID iD for Dunbar, James orcid.org/0000-0003-0866-4365
Journal name Family practice
Volume number 31
Issue number 4
Start page 437
End page 444
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0263-2136
1460-2229
Keyword(s) health promotion
health behavior change
hypertension
lifestyle modification
multidisciplinary care
patient education
primary care
Summary Background. Several effective methods to facilitate patient self-management of hypertension are available in primary care. These include direct support from community pharmacists and general practice, and the use of home blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The aim of this study is to establish the prevalence of use of key strategies and to determine their independent relationship with patient self-management attributes.

Methods.
A survey of patients with treated hypertension was undertaken in 27 community pharmacies. This established recent use of BP monitoring and advice from health professionals. Patient awareness of BP and targets, appropriateness of BP targets and adherence to anti-hypertensive medications were assessed as indicative self-management outcomes. Predictors of outcomes were determined using binary logistic regression.

Results. Overall, 215 surveys were returned. Two-thirds of patients were aged >65 years, and 45% had conditions warranting tighter BP control (<130/80 mmHg). Almost all patients reported monitoring of their BP in the previous year and 63% could report their most recent BP reading. Just 36% reported knowing a target BP, and 78% of reported targets were within guidelines recommendations. One-fifth (22%) monitored their own BP, and 15% reported non-adherence to medication. Doctors provided the large majority of professional advice. Self-monitoring or documentation of BP readings was independently associated with increased likelihood of BP and target BP being known.

Conclusions. Regular monitoring of BP does not automatically translate to professional advice. Increased uptake of patient self-monitoring should be promoted as a means of enabling self-management.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/fampra/cmu026
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Oxford University Press
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064828

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.