Openly accessible

IUGR in the absence of postnatal 'catch-up' growth leads to improved whole body insulin sensitivity in rat offspring

Lim, Kyungjoon, Armitage, James A., Stefanidis, Aneta, Oldfield, Brian J. and Black, Mary Jane 2011, IUGR in the absence of postnatal 'catch-up' growth leads to improved whole body insulin sensitivity in rat offspring, Pediatric research, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 339-344, doi: 10.1203/PDR.0b013e31822a65a3.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title IUGR in the absence of postnatal 'catch-up' growth leads to improved whole body insulin sensitivity in rat offspring
Author(s) Lim, Kyungjoon
Armitage, James A.ORCID iD for Armitage, James A. orcid.org/0000-0002-3762-0911
Stefanidis, Aneta
Oldfield, Brian J.
Black, Mary Jane
Journal name Pediatric research
Volume number 70
Issue number 4
Start page 339
End page 344
Total pages 6
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication New York, N.Y.
Publication date 2011-10
ISSN 0031-3998
1530-0447
Keyword(s) BWT
body weight
diet
Summary A suboptimal in utero environment leads to fetal adaptations to ensure short-term survival but in the long-term may lead to disease when the postnatal growth does not reflect that in utero. This study examined the effect of IUGR on whole body insulin sensitivity and metabolic activity in adult rats. Female Wistar-Kyoto rats were fed either a normal protein diet (NPD 20% casein) or a low protein diet (LPD; 8.7% casein) during pregnancy and 2 wk of lactation. In offspring at 32 wk of age, indirect calorimetry and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) were performed to assess metabolic activity and body composition. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. At 3 d of age, male and female LPD offspring were 23 and 27% smaller than controls, respectively. They remained significantly smaller throughout the experimental period (~10% smaller at 32 wk). Importantly, there was increased insulin sensitivity in LPD offspring (47% increase in males and 38% increase in females); pancreatic insulin content was normal. Body composition, O2 consumption, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and locomotor activity were not different to controls. These findings suggest that in the absence of “catch-up” growth IUGR programs for improved insulin sensitivity.
Language eng
DOI 10.1203/PDR.0b013e31822a65a3
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2011, Nature Publishing Group
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064860

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 33 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 34 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 428 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 07 Jul 2014, 15:16:37 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.