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When nutritional guidelines and life collide: family fruit and vegetable socialisation practices in low socioeconomic communities

Judd, Stephanie M., Newton, Joshua D., Newton, Fiona J. and Ewing, Michael T. 2014, When nutritional guidelines and life collide: family fruit and vegetable socialisation practices in low socioeconomic communities, Journal of marketing management, vol. 30, no. 15-16, pp. 1625-1653, doi: 10.1080/0267257X.2014.929163.

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Title When nutritional guidelines and life collide: family fruit and vegetable socialisation practices in low socioeconomic communities
Author(s) Judd, Stephanie M.
Newton, Joshua D.ORCID iD for Newton, Joshua D. orcid.org/0000-0002-7892-361X
Newton, Fiona J.
Ewing, Michael T.ORCID iD for Ewing, Michael T. orcid.org/0000-0002-2260-2761
Journal name Journal of marketing management
Volume number 30
Issue number 15-16
Start page 1625
End page 1653
Total pages 29
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2014-06-30
ISSN 0267-257X
1472-1376
Keyword(s) fruit and vegetable consumption
socialisation
family
children
Summary Parents play a critical role in promoting fruit and vegetable consumption, for eating patterns established early in life tend to persist into adulthood. Despite this, the factors that facilitate or inhibit parents’ capacity to socialise fruit and vegetable consumption into their children’s daily diets remain poorly defined. Thirty-eight semi-structured interviews with residents, allied healthcare professionals, community leaders, community programme leaders and a local government leader living or working in two low socioeconomic suburbs were consequently conducted to ascertain factors exogenous and endogenous to the family unit that shaped parental food socialisation practices. Budgetary and time constraints emerged as exogenous factors that constrained fruit and vegetable socialisation. Constraining effects were also found for a range of endogenous factors, including commensal experiences, children’s food fussiness and the feeding styles employed by parents. As such, while many caregivers may wish to socialise fruit and vegetable consumption into their children’s daily diets, their capacity to do so is often inhibited by factors beyond their volitional control. Failure to take heed of these factors could therefore result in the development of social marketing campaigns that are ineffective at best or give rise to unintentionally harmful outcomes at worst.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/0267257X.2014.929163
Field of Research 150503 Marketing Management (incl Strategy and Customer Relations)
Socio Economic Objective 920205 Health Education and Promotion
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064881

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Business and Law
School of Management and Marketing
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Created: Wed, 09 Jul 2014, 10:48:51 EST by Gloria Stevenson

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