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Crossing borders as Mestizas and Coyotes: recognising older Somali women's shifting subjectivities in Australia

Birch, Georgia 2014, Crossing borders as Mestizas and Coyotes: recognising older Somali women's shifting subjectivities in Australia. In Pallotta-Chiarolli, Maria and Pease, Bob (ed), Politics of recognition and social justice : transforming subjectivities and new forms of resistance, Routledge, New York, NY, pp.109-125.

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Title Crossing borders as Mestizas and Coyotes: recognising older Somali women's shifting subjectivities in Australia
Author(s) Birch, Georgia
Title of book Politics of recognition and social justice : transforming subjectivities and new forms of resistance
Editor(s) Pallotta-Chiarolli, MariaORCID iD for Pallotta-Chiarolli, Maria orcid.org/0000-0003-3601-4642
Pease, Bob
Publication date 2014
Chapter number 7
Total chapters 16
Start page 109
End page 125
Total pages 17
Publisher Routledge
Place of Publication New York, NY
Keyword(s) subjectivities
Somali
women
multicultural
whiteness
interweaving
aging
Coyotes
Metizas
Summary

The gender and ethnic identities of older Somali women in Melbourne, Australia shaped and informed the findings of how previous physical activity and motherhood influenced their activity levels later in life.  This study is also an example of how the researcher and the participants navigated and negotiated the borders, shifting their subjectivities to create health behaviours that help exist in Western culture. This research consequently developed into two main pathways, firstly an exploration of how cross-cultural research methodology on the borders can be undertaken and, secondly, an analysis of the women's perspectives and experiences around physical activity and motherhood. A narrative method of data collection enabled research participants to express views from their standpoint. The role of an arts based program elicited honest responses and real stories and provided an environment where participants felt free and able to talk. It also enabled me to present their views in their words and in a style that allowed them to speak. The Somali women live in the ‘white’ dominant culture of Australia, yet constantly cross the borders between their traditional Somali culture and the dominant culture, juggling each value system. Using Anzaldua (1987) borderland framework this chapter explores these border crossings and understands how the women develop strategies for resistance and survival. It also highlights me as the researcher transforming my subjectivity within the structures of my own dominant culture.

ISBN 0415819458
9780415819459
Language eng
Field of Research 160807 Sociological Methodology and Research Methods
Socio Economic Objective 920502 Health Related to Ageing
HERDC Research category B1.1 Book chapter
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30064901

Document type: Book Chapter
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Sat, 12 Jul 2014, 14:49:37 EST by Georgia Birch

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