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Seriality and persona

Marshall, P. David 2014, Seriality and persona, M/C journal : a journal of media and culture, vol. 17, no. 3, Article 802, pp. 1-10.

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Title Seriality and persona
Author(s) Marshall, P. DavidORCID iD for Marshall, P. David orcid.org/0000-0002-0418-4447
Journal name M/C journal : a journal of media and culture
Volume number 17
Issue number 3
Season Article 802
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Queensland University of Technology
Place of publication Brisbane, Qld.
Publication date 2014-06-26
ISSN 1441-2616
Keyword(s) persona
seriality
serials
personnage
television
character
popular music
online culture
Summary  Persona is a public presentation of identity. One of the key values of a persona is its consistency in its presentation of the self. This article is designed to be the first exploratory steps and overview in charting the idea of seriality in relation to persona and its utility as a concept to describe the constancy and transformation of identity that is now elemental to understanding contemporary persona or the public presentation of the self and its online manifestations. Seriality in terms of persona is first investigated from its entertainment culture origins – with its use in the constitution of characters in fiction in novels, films, games and most prevalently in television. Several examples of serial persona will be analysed with an emphasis on how television has constructed often the most powerful personas: Kevin Spacey’s persona as Frank Underwood in House of Cards is discussed in greater detail in terms of the economic, cultural and affective value of serial persona and its associated formations of risk. It then explores the blending of the fictional and the real in seriality through how popular music performers – in particular Eminem - construct an authentic register of persona to allow for the exploration of the self through emotion and connection. The article concludes with thinking how seriality is connected to the constitutions of online identity and links the concept with aspects of virality and meme culture and their constructions of value, patterns and constancy as it relate to the presentation of the public self.
Language eng
Field of Research 200104 Media Studies
200101 Communication Studies
200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Queensland University of Technology
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065071

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Created: Wed, 23 Jul 2014, 16:09:13 EST by David Marshall

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.