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Development and implementation of a novel measure for quantifying training loads in rowing : the T2minute method

Tran, Jacqueline J., Rice, Anthony J., Main, Luana C. and Gastin, Paul B. 2014, Development and implementation of a novel measure for quantifying training loads in rowing : the T2minute method, Journal of strength and conditioning research, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 1172-1180, doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000248.

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Title Development and implementation of a novel measure for quantifying training loads in rowing : the T2minute method
Author(s) Tran, Jacqueline J.
Rice, Anthony J.
Main, Luana C.ORCID iD for Main, Luana C. orcid.org/0000-0002-9576-9466
Gastin, Paul B.ORCID iD for Gastin, Paul B. orcid.org/0000-0003-2320-7875
Journal name Journal of strength and conditioning research
Volume number 28
Issue number 4
Start page 1172
End page 1180
Total pages 9
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA
Publication date 2014-04
ISSN 1533-4287
Keyword(s) training
monitoring
rowers
Summary Development and implementation of a novel measure for quantifying training loads in rowing: The T2minute method. J Strength Cond Res 28(4): 1172–1180, 2014—The systematic management of training requires accurate training load measurement. However, quantifying the training of elite Australian rowers is challenging because of (a) the multicenter, multistate structure of the national program; (b) the variety of training undertaken; and (c) the limitations of existing methods for quantifying the loads accumulated from varied training formats. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to develop a new measure for quantifying training loads in rowing (the T2minute method). Sport scientists and senior coaches at the National Rowing Center of Excellence collaborated to develop the measure, which incorporates training duration, intensity, and mode to quantify a single index of training load. To account for training at different intensities, the method uses standardized intensity zones (T zones) established at the Australian Institute of Sport. Each zone was assigned a weighting factor according to the curvilinear relationship between power output and blood lactate response. Each training mode was assigned a weighting factor based on whether coaches perceived it to be “harder” or “easier” than on-water rowing. A common measurement unit, the T2minute, was defined to normalize sessions in different modes to a single index of load; one T2minute is equivalent to 1 minute of on-water single scull rowing at T2 intensity (approximately 60–72% V[Combining Dot Above]O2max). The T2minute method was successfully implemented to support national training strategies in Australian high performance rowing. By incorporating duration, intensity, and mode, the T2minute method extends the concepts that underpin current load measures, providing 1 consistent system to quantify loads from varied training formats.
Language eng
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000248
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065295

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Centre for Exercise and Sport Science
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Created: Tue, 05 Aug 2014, 14:49:32 EST by Paul Gastin

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