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Psychosocial stress is positively associated with body mass index gain over 5 years : evidence from the longitudinal AusDiab study

Harding, Jessica L., Backholer, Kathryn, Williams, Emily D., Peeters, Anna, Cameron, Adrian J., Hare, Matthew J. L., Shaw, Jonathan E. and Magliano, Dianna J. 2014, Psychosocial stress is positively associated with body mass index gain over 5 years : evidence from the longitudinal AusDiab study, Obesity, vol. 22, no. 1, pp. 277-286, doi: 10.1002/oby.20423.

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Title Psychosocial stress is positively associated with body mass index gain over 5 years : evidence from the longitudinal AusDiab study
Author(s) Harding, Jessica L.
Backholer, Kathryn
Williams, Emily D.
Peeters, Anna
Cameron, Adrian J.ORCID iD for Cameron, Adrian J. orcid.org/0000-0002-0568-5497
Hare, Matthew J. L.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Magliano, Dianna J.
Journal name Obesity
Volume number 22
Issue number 1
Start page 277
End page 286
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ
Publication date 2014-01
ISSN 1930-7381
Summary Objective
Emerging evidence suggests that psychosocial stress may influence weight gain. The relationship between stress and weight change and whether this was influenced by demographic and behavioral factors was explored.

Design and Methods
A total of 5,118 participants of AusDiab were prospectively followed from 2000 to 2005. The relationship between stress at baseline and BMI change was assessed using linear regression.

Results
Among those who maintained/gained weight, individuals with high levels of perceived stress at baseline experienced a 0.20 kg/m2 (95% CI: 0.07-0.33) greater mean change in BMI compared with those with low stress. Additionally, individuals who experienced 2 or ≥3 stressful life events had a 0.13 kg/m2 (0.00-0.26) and 0.26 kg/m2 (0.14-0.38) greater increase in BMI compared with people with none. These relationships differed by age, smoking, and baseline BMI. Further, those with multiple sources of stressors were at the greatest risk of weight gain.

Conclusion
Psychosocial stress, including both perceived stress and life events stress, was positively associated with weight gain but not weight loss. These associations varied by age, smoking, obesity, and multiple sources of stressors. Future treatment and interventions for overweight and obese people should consider the psychosocial factors that may influence weight gain.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/oby.20423
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065410

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Thu, 14 Aug 2014, 14:43:06 EST by Jane Moschetti

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