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Topical arnica and mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (hirudoid) to decrease bruising and pain associated with haemodialysis cannulation - related infiltration: a pilot study

Goedemans, Anne, Liang, Karen, Cottell, Barb, Ockerby, Cherene and Bennett, Paul N. 2014, Topical arnica and mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (hirudoid) to decrease bruising and pain associated with haemodialysis cannulation - related infiltration: a pilot study, Renal society of Australasia journal, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 62-65.

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Title Topical arnica and mucopolysaccharide polysulfate (hirudoid) to decrease bruising and pain associated with haemodialysis cannulation - related infiltration: a pilot study
Author(s) Goedemans, Anne
Liang, Karen
Cottell, Barb
Ockerby, Cherene
Bennett, Paul N.ORCID iD for Bennett, Paul N. orcid.org/0000-0001-9174-3499
Journal name Renal society of Australasia journal
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Start page 62
End page 65
Total pages 4
Publisher Renal Society of Australasia
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 2014-07
ISSN 1832-3804
Keyword(s) extravasation
haemodialysis
cannulation
arnica
mucopolysaccharide polysulfate
Summary ABSTRACT
Background
Topical treatments such as Arnica cream and mucopolysaccharide polysulfuric acid (contained in Hirudoid cream) have been used to treat the bruising and pain arising from dialysis-related infiltrations.
Aim: 
To undertake a randomised controlled pilot study comparing the efficacy of Arnica and Hirudoid creams in treating bruising and pain following post-needling infiltration.
Methods: 
One dialysis centre of 40 patients over a 12-month period. Following infiltration, and at the five subsequent dialysis treatments, pain was measured using the Abbey pain scale and size of the bruise was recorded.
Results: 
Eleven cases of infiltration were recorded consisting of seven males (64%) and four females (36%) who had a mean age of 78 years (SD=9). Access for eight patients was via arteriovenous fistula and for three patients via arteriovenous graft. Eight patients experienced bruising and two patients reported mild pain post-infiltration but there were no differences found between the effect of Arnica or Hirudoid in treating either symptom.
Conclusion: 
This pilot study was unable to detect any differences in the effect of Arnica and Hirudoid on pain or bruising. The study demonstrated that a larger, multicentre trial would be required to power a study and that a non-interventional control group should be added.
Language eng
Field of Research 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920210 Nursing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Renal Society of Australasia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065430

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.