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Longitudinal associations between fish consumption and depression in young adults

Smith, Kylie J., Sanderson, Kristy, McNaughton, Sarah A., Gall, Seana L., Dwyer, Terry and Venn, Alison J. 2014, Longitudinal associations between fish consumption and depression in young adults, American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 179, no. 10, pp. 1228-1235, doi: 10.1093/aje/kwu050.

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Title Longitudinal associations between fish consumption and depression in young adults
Author(s) Smith, Kylie J.
Sanderson, Kristy
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Gall, Seana L.
Dwyer, Terry
Venn, Alison J.
Journal name American Journal of Epidemiology
Volume number 179
Issue number 10
Start page 1228
End page 1235
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Cary, N.C.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 0002-9262
Keyword(s) depression
depressive disorders
diet
fish
longitudinal studies
Summary Few studies have examined longitudinal associations between fish consumption and depression; none have defined depression using a diagnostic tool. We investigated whether fish consumption was associated with fewer new depression episodes in a national study of Australian adults. In 2004–2006, 1,386 adults aged 26–36 years (38% males) completed a 127-item (9 fish items) food frequency questionnaire. Fish intake was examined continuously (times/week) and dichotomously (reference group: <2 times/week). During 2009–2011, the lifetime version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview was administered by telephone. New episodes of major depression/dysthymic disorder (since baseline) were defined using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. During follow-up, 160 (18.8%) women and 70 (13.1%) men experienced depression. For women, each additional weekly serving of fish consumed at baseline decreased the risk of having a new depressive episode by 6% (adjusted relative risk = 0.94, 95% confidence interval: 0.87, 1.01). Women who ate fish ≥2 times/week at baseline had a 25% lower risk of depression during follow-up than those who ate fish <2 times/week (adjusted relative risk = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.57, 0.99). Reverse causation was also suggested but appeared to be restricted to persons with recent depression. Fish consumption was not associated with depression in men. These findings provide further evidence that fish consumption may be beneficial for women's mental health.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwu050
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Grant ID NHMRC 211316
NHMRC 544923
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Free to Read Start Date 2016-01-01
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065449

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.