Understanding the link between body image and binge eating: a model comparison approach

Holmes, Millicent, Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew, Skouteris, Helen and Broadbent, Jaclyn 2015, Understanding the link between body image and binge eating: a model comparison approach, Eating and weight disorders : studies on anorexia, bulimia and obesity, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 81-89.

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Title Understanding the link between body image and binge eating: a model comparison approach
Author(s) Holmes, Millicent
Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, MatthewORCID iD for Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew orcid.org/0000-0003-1145-6057
Skouteris, Helen
Broadbent, JaclynORCID iD for Broadbent, Jaclyn orcid.org/0000-0003-4045-2039
Journal name Eating and weight disorders : studies on anorexia, bulimia and obesity
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Start page 81
End page 89
Total pages 9
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 1590-1262
1124-4909
Keyword(s) dual pathway model
escape from awareness
self-objectification
binge eating
body dissatisfaction
Summary Purpose
The present study tests several competing, explanatory models—dual pathways, escape from awareness, and objectification theory—for the established link between body dissatisfaction and binge eating.

Methods
408 women aged between 18 and 40 years completed a survey designed to assess contributions of proposed mediators (dietary restraint and negative affect from the dual pathway model, self-distraction from the escape from awareness model, and interoceptive deficits from objectification theory) for the body dissatisfaction–binge eating relationship.

Results
Although mediation analyses supported the dual pathway model and objectification theory when tested separately, the dual pathway model most strongly predicted the body dissatisfaction–binge eating relationship. Both model-implied mediators (dietary restraint and negative affect) made significant unique contributions, accounting for roughly one-quarter of the shared variance between body dissatisfaction and binge eating when tested separately from other mediators. Improvements in variance explained were negligible once other proposed mediators were included in a test of models combined.

Conclusions
Collectively, these findings suggest the superiority of the dual pathway model over objectification theory and the escape model, but the remaining unaccounted for covariance suggests need to consider alternative mechanisms that may also account for the relationship between body dissatisfaction and binge eating.
Language eng
Field of Research 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, Springer
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065484

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 28 Aug 2014, 13:57:48 EST by Jaclyn Broadbent

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