You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Home delivery in Southern Lao PDR: challenges to achieving MDG 4 & 5 targets

Sanaphay, Anousavanh, Daenseekaew, Somjit, Smith, John F., Eckermann, Elizabeth and Scopaz, Anna 2014, Home delivery in Southern Lao PDR: challenges to achieving MDG 4 & 5 targets, Philippine journal of nursing, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 24-31.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
eckermann-homedelivery-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 2.41MB 163

Title Home delivery in Southern Lao PDR: challenges to achieving MDG 4 & 5 targets
Author(s) Sanaphay, Anousavanh
Daenseekaew, Somjit
Smith, John F.
Eckermann, ElizabethORCID iD for Eckermann, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-4908-5629
Scopaz, Anna
Journal name Philippine journal of nursing
Volume number 84
Issue number 1
Start page 24
End page 31
Total pages 8
Publisher Philippine Nurses Association
Place of publication [Manila, Philippines]
Publication date 2014-01
ISSN 0048-3818
Keyword(s) home delivery
maternal and child health
Lao PDR
Summary This study investigated rural Lao PDR village women's views and experiences of recent, or impeding, childbirth to better understand barriers to maternity service usage. Lao PDR has the highest maternal mortality rate (MMR) in the South-East Asian region with very low utilization rates for skilled birth assistance and health sector delivery services. The study site, Sekong, a southern Lao province, was lowest in the country on virtually all indicators of reproductive and maternal health, despite several recent maternal health service interventions. The study's aim was to gain a fuller understanding of barriers to maternity services usage to contribute towards maternity services enhancement, and district and national policy-making for progressing towards 2015 MDG 4 & 5 targets. 

A descriptive cross-sectional study was used. First, face-to-face questionnaires were used to collect demographic and reproductive health and health care experience data from 166 village woman (120 with a child born in the previous year, and 46 who were currently pregnant). In- epth individual interviews then followed with 23 purposively selected woman, to probe personal experiences and perspectives on why women preferred home birthing.

The majority of women had given birth at home, assisted by untrained birth attendants (relatives or neighbours). While seventy percent had accessed some antenatal services, postpartum follow-up attendance was very low (17 percent). Limited finances, lack of access to transport and prior negative health service experiences were important factors influencing women's decision making. Giving birth at home was seen by many, not just as unavoidable, but, as the preferred option.

Recent top-down maternal health initiatives have had little impact in this region. Improving maternal and child-health strategies requires much greater community participation and use of participatory action methodologies, to increase women's engagement in policy and planning and subsequent usage of health service developments. 
Language eng
Field of Research 160801 Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 920507 Women's Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Philippine Nurses Association
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065488

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Link to Related Work
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 403 Abstract Views, 164 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 28 Aug 2014, 15:00:06 EST by Kylie Koulkoudinas

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.