Feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) weight management programme for New Zealand adults

Mhurchu, Cliona Ni, Whittaker, Robyn, McRobbie, Hayden, Ball, Kylie, Crawford, David, Michie, Jo, Jiang, Yannan, Maddison, Ralph, Waterlander, Wilma and Myers, Katie 2014, Feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) weight management programme for New Zealand adults, BMC obesity, vol. 1, no. 10, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/2052-9538-1-10.

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Title Feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of a mobile health (mHealth) weight management programme for New Zealand adults
Author(s) Mhurchu, Cliona Ni
Whittaker, Robyn
McRobbie, Hayden
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Crawford, DavidORCID iD for Crawford, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
Michie, Jo
Jiang, Yannan
Maddison, RalphORCID iD for Maddison, Ralph orcid.org/0000-0001-8564-5518
Waterlander, Wilma
Myers, Katie
Journal name BMC obesity
Volume number 1
Issue number 10
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1930-7381
Keyword(s) obesity
text message
mHealth
Summary Background
Mobile health (mHealth) behaviour change programmes use mobile phones and the internet to deliver health information and behaviour change support to participants. Such programmes offer a potentially cost-effective way to reach many individuals who do not currently access weight loss services. We developed a mHealth weight management programme using proven face-to-face behaviour change techniques and incorporating target population input. Our aim was to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and potential effectiveness of this programme for ethnically diverse adults with a view to informing a larger trial.

Results
Fifty three adults who had a BMI of ≥25 kg/m2 and wanted to lose weight (81% female, mean age 42 years, mean BMI 35.7 kg/m2, 26% Maori, 34% Pacific) received the eight-week mHealth weight loss programme. Anthropometric measures were taken at two face-to-face assessments at baseline and 12-weeks (i.e. four weeks after cessation of intervention).

Twelve-week follow-up measurements were available for 36/53 participants (68%). Non-completers were younger and more likely to be male and of Pacific ethnicity. Thirty five participants (66%) reported reading ‘all or most’ text messages sent and 96% responded to at least one text data collection question over the eight-week active intervention period. Eighty one per cent of participants logged in to the study website at least once during the eight-week study period. In the intention-to-treat analysis, mean weight change was -1.0 kg (SD 3.1) at 12 weeks (p = 0.024) and change in BMI was -0.34 kg/m2 (SD 1.1) (p = 0.026). In the completers only analysis (n = 36), mean weight change was -1.4 kg (SD 3.6) (p = 0.023) and change in BMI was -0.50 kg/m2 (SD 1.3) (p = 0.025).

Conclusions
A mHealth weight management programme is feasible to deliver to an ethnically diverse population. Changes in body weight and BMI at 12 weeks indicate that the programme could be effective in supporting people with weight loss. However, the high dropout rate indicates a need for further improvements to the programme.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/2052-9538-1-10
Field of Research 111199 Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920411 Nutrition
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Wiley-Blackwell
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065573

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Created: Tue, 02 Sep 2014, 12:42:33 EST by Jane Moschetti

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