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Acting on job stress - do we have a context for action?

Shaw, Andrea and LaMontagne, Anthony 2006, Acting on job stress - do we have a context for action?, in HFESA 2006 : Proceedings of the 42nd annual conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia, Sydney, N.S.W., pp. 1-9.

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Title Acting on job stress - do we have a context for action?
Author(s) Shaw, Andrea
LaMontagne, AnthonyORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Conference name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia. Conference (42nd : 2006 : Sydney, New South Wales)
Conference location Sydney, New South Wales
Conference dates 20-22 Nov. 2006
Title of proceedings HFESA 2006 : Proceedings of the 42nd annual conference of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2006
Conference series Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Conference
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Place of publication Sydney, N.S.W.
Keyword(s) job stress
stakeholder views
interventions
Summary Psychosocial risk is possibly the single biggest cause of occupational ill-health inAustralia, causing up to 30% of cardiovascular disease in working men and up to 30% ofdepression in working women. While the number of studies on effective workplaceinterventions has increased significantly in recent years, there has been at best onlylimited analysis examining the context for these interventions. The literature provideslittle evidence with which to answer critical public policy questions. In order to determine how diverse stakeholders are responding to job stress, this studydirectly sought to characterise this context. Through interviews across industry and withkey stakeholders, this study provides a thorough and empirically grounded description ofcurrent Victorian practice, a critical support for developing a systems approach toworkplace stress. The interviews examined the views of Victorian stakeholders in thearea of job stress to investigate understanding of and receptivity to systems approaches and reviewed experiences in workplaces. The picture that emerges from the interview data is contrasting, but with common features across groups. Most parties understood stress as an individual health issue, even though the links to the wider workplace environment were recognised by many. The views of some interviewees imply moral judgements about acceptable stress, experienced by “good” people who deal with trauma and conflict in their work, and unacceptable stress, experienced by “bad” people who can’t cope with the ups and downs of working life. Even so, the need to deal with job stress is recognised by all.
Language eng
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category E1.1 Full written paper - refereed
Copyright notice ©2006, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065687

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.