Employment arrangements and mental health in a cohort of working Australians : are transitions from permanent to temporary employment associated with changes in mental health?

LaMontagne, Anthony D., Milner, Allison, Krnjacki, Lauren, Kavanagh, Anne M., Blakely, Tony A. and Bentley, Rebecca 2014, Employment arrangements and mental health in a cohort of working Australians : are transitions from permanent to temporary employment associated with changes in mental health?, American journal of epidemiology, vol. 179, no. 12, pp. 1467-1476, doi: 10.1093/aje/kwu093.

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Title Employment arrangements and mental health in a cohort of working Australians : are transitions from permanent to temporary employment associated with changes in mental health?
Author(s) LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Milner, Allison
Krnjacki, Lauren
Kavanagh, Anne M.
Blakely, Tony A.
Bentley, Rebecca
Journal name American journal of epidemiology
Volume number 179
Issue number 12
Start page 1467
End page 1476
Total pages 10
Publisher Oxford Journals
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1476-6256
Keyword(s) employment
employment arrangements
employment transitions
mental health
temporary employment
Summary We investigated whether being in temporary employment, as compared with permanent employment, was associated with a difference in Short Form 36 mental health and whether transitions from permanent employment to temporary employment were associated with mental health changes. We used fixed-effects regression in a nationally representative Australian sample with 10 waves of data collection (2001–2010). Interactions by age and sex were tested. Two forms of temporary employment were studied: “casual” (no paid leave entitlements or fixed hours) and “fixed-term contract” (a defined employment period plus paid leave). There were no significant mental health differences between temporary employment and permanent employment in standard fixed-effects analyses and no significant interactions by sex or age. For all age groups combined, there were no significant changes in mental health following transitions from stable permanent employment to temporary employment, but there was a significant interaction with age (P = 0.03) for the stable-permanent-to-casual employment transition, because of a small transition-associated improvement in mental health for workers aged 55–64 years (β = 1.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.34, 2.87; 16% of the standard deviation of mental health scores). Our analyses suggest that temporary employment is not harmful to mental health in the Australian context and that it may be beneficial for 55- to 64-year-olds transitioning from stable permanent employment to casual employment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwu093
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065775

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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