Unilateral bicep curl hemodynamics: low-pressure continuous vs high-pressure intermittent blood flow restriction

Brandner, C. R., Kidgell, D. J. and Warmington, S. A. 2015, Unilateral bicep curl hemodynamics: low-pressure continuous vs high-pressure intermittent blood flow restriction, Scandinavian journal of medicine and science in sports, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 770-777, doi: 10.1111/sms.12297.

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Title Unilateral bicep curl hemodynamics: low-pressure continuous vs high-pressure intermittent blood flow restriction
Author(s) Brandner, C. R.
Kidgell, D. J.
Warmington, S. A.ORCID iD for Warmington, S. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-2414-7539
Journal name Scandinavian journal of medicine and science in sports
Volume number 25
Issue number 6
Start page 770
End page 777
Total pages 8
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015-12
ISSN 0905-7188
1600-0838
Summary  Light-load exercise training with blood flow restriction (BFR) increases muscle strength and size. However, the hemodynamics of BFR exercise appear elevated compared with non-BFR exercise. This questions the suitability of BFR in special/clinical populations. Nevertheless, hemodynamics of standard prescription protocols for BFR and traditional heavy-load exercise have not been compared. We investigated the hemodynamics of two common BFR exercise methods and two traditional resistance exercises. Twelve young males completed four unilateral elbow flexion exercise trials in a balanced, randomized crossover design: (a) heavy load [HL; 80% one-repetition maximum (1-RM)]; (b) light load (LL; 20% 1-RM); and two other light-load trials with BFR applied (c) continuously at 80% resting systolic blood pressure (BFR-C) or (d) intermittently at 130% resting systolic blood pressure (BFR-I). Hemodynamics were measured at baseline, during exercise, and for 60-min post-exercise. Exercising heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac output, and rate–pressure product were significantly greater for HL and BFR-I compared with LL. The magnitude of hemodynamic stress for BFR-C was between that of HL and LL. These data show reduced hemodynamics for continuous low-pressure BFR exercise compared with intermittent high-pressure BFR in young healthy populations. BFR remains a potentially viable method to improve muscle mass and strength in special/clinical populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/sms.12297
Field of Research 110903 Central Nervous System
Socio Economic Objective 920412 Preventive Medicine
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, John Wiley & Sons
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065814

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