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Benchmarks of Victorian commercial goat meat enterprises

Ferrier, G.R. and McGregor, B. A. 2002, Benchmarks of Victorian commercial goat meat enterprises, in ASAP 2002 : Finding the balance : Proceedings of the Australian Society of Animal Production 2002 biennial conference, Australian Society of Animal Production, Armidale, N. S. W., pp. 65-68.

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Title Benchmarks of Victorian commercial goat meat enterprises
Author(s) Ferrier, G.R.
McGregor, B. A.ORCID iD for McGregor, B. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Conference name Australian Society of Animal Production. Biennial Conference (24th : 2002 : Adelaide, S. A.)
Conference location Adelaide, S. A.
Conference dates 11 Jul. 2002
Title of proceedings ASAP 2002 : Finding the balance : Proceedings of the Australian Society of Animal Production 2002 biennial conference
Editor(s) [Unknown]
Publication date 2002
Conference series Australian Society of Animal Production Biennial Conference
Start page 65
End page 68
Total pages 4
Publisher Australian Society of Animal Production
Place of publication Armidale, N. S. W.
Keyword(s) goat
goat meat
production benchmarks
Summary The Australian goat meat industry has mostly processed feral goats for export. As goat meat markets mature there will be an increased demand for farmed goats to meet supply, especially into niche markets. Production benchmarking showed that Victorian commercial goat meat producers are located generally in areas with <500 mm rainfall, usually in conjunction with other livestock and cropping enterprises. On average, 67% of farm area, equal to 701 ha (range 55 – 4400 ha) was allocated to the goat enterprise. Commercial producers used Boer bucks, at an average mating rate of 2.2%, over Boer X or feral X does. Weaning rates averaged 99% (range 51 - 165%). There was a large range in husbandry ($0 - $3.07) and supplementary feeding ($6.75 - $9.60) expenditure. Fifty percent of producers indicated that they carried out regular faecal egg counts to assess worm burdens. Seasonal supply patterns showed that producers were supplying Christmas and Easter markets with a live weight range of 12 - 40 kg and an overall average live weight of 26 kg. The issues of concern identified by commercial growers were: internal parasitism, doe fertility, kid predation, kid growth rates, Johnes disease, and fencing security. This study indicated that there is considerable scope to improve the productivity of the Victorian commercial goat meat industry. Most producers supply smaller carcases on a strong seasonal basis. This supply pattern inhibits industry development.
Notes Vol. 24
ISSN 0728-5965
Language eng
Field of Research 079999 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category EN.1 Other conference paper
Copyright notice ©2002, Australian Society of Animal Production
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30065859

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.