Effects of different nutritional regimens on the productivity of Australian Cashmere goats and the partitioning of nutrients between cashmere and hair growth

McGregor, B. A. 1988, Effects of different nutritional regimens on the productivity of Australian Cashmere goats and the partitioning of nutrients between cashmere and hair growth, Australian journal of experimental agriculture, vol. 28, pp. 459-467, doi: 10.1071/EA9880459.

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Title Effects of different nutritional regimens on the productivity of Australian Cashmere goats and the partitioning of nutrients between cashmere and hair growth
Author(s) McGregor, B. A.ORCID iD for McGregor, B. A. orcid.org/0000-0002-4574-4236
Journal name Australian journal of experimental agriculture
Volume number 28
Start page 459
End page 467
Total pages 9
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Place of publication Melbourne, Vic.
Publication date 1988
ISSN 0816-1089
1446-5574
Keyword(s) effects
nutritional regimens
productivity
Australian Cashmere goats
nutrient partitioning
cashmere
hair growth
Summary The influence of energy or protein supplementation or energy restriction on cashmere growth was studied in 35 highly productive cashmere wether goats. The goats were shorn on 3 December and randomly allocated to 3 levels of energy intake: M, goats fed to maintain liveweight; 0.8M, goats fed to lose 5 kg liveweight from December to April and then fed ad libitum; and >M, goats fed to gain liveweight. Nested within >M were ADLIB (goats offered feed ad libitum), and 1.25M and l.5M (goats fed M plus 25 or 50% of the difference in mean intake between M and ADLIB). The metabolisable energy requirement to maintain liveweight was 250 kJ kg-0.75 day-1 but to maintain body condition (l.25M) it was 3 12 kJ kg-0.75 day-1. Goats fed 0.8M had a mean intake of 0.68M and lost 26 g day-1 liveweight until April, but when fed ad libitum consumed 2.15M in June and grew rapidly in late autumn and winter at 93 g day-1. Goats fed ADLIB consumed 2.30M in February and gained 87 g day-1 from December to February, but intake declined to 1.61 M in June and they gained 20 g day-1 from April to June. Cashmere growth and fibre diameters of fleeces shorn on 17 June of goats fed >M (221g, 17.69 pm) were significantly greater (P< 0.02) than those of goats fed 0.8M (146 g, 16.67 ¦m), with levels of M-fed goats being intermediate. Within >M, there were no significant differences in cashmere growth. Protein supplementation within M (27 or 54 g day -1 formaldehyde- treated casein) resulted in 40% more wool growth in sheep (P<0.001), but no increase in cashmere or hair growth in goats. Goats fed ADLIB had significantly reduced cashmere yields (P < 0.05) and grew more hair (P<0.05) than did goats in other treatments. About 4 weeks after energy supplementation, fibre diameter of previously energy-deprived goats increased (P< 0.01). Midside patches indicated that energy-deprived goats, which lost liveweight, diverted nutrients preferentially to cashmere growth, while goats fed ADLIB partitioned nutrients towards hair growth. To maximise cashmere growth, supplementary energy should be supplied to avoid liveweight loss from December to April. Goats that had small (1-2 kg) liveweight gains and maintained body condition achieved near maximal levels of cashmere growth.
Language eng
DOI 10.1071/EA9880459
Field of Research 079999 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970107 Expanding Knowledge in the Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©1988, CSIRO Publishing
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066111

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