Comparison of food industry policies and commitments on marketing to children and product (re)formulation in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji

Sacks, Gary, Mialon, Melissa, Vandevijvere, Stefanie, Trevena, Helen, Snowdon, Wendy, Crino, Michelle and Swinburn, Boyd 2015, Comparison of food industry policies and commitments on marketing to children and product (re)formulation in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji, Critical public health, vol. 25, no. 3, Special Issue: “Big Food”: Critical perspectives on the global growth of the food and beverage industry. Guest editors: Simon N. Williams and Marion Nestle, pp. 299-319, doi: 10.1080/09581596.2014.946888.

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Title Comparison of food industry policies and commitments on marketing to children and product (re)formulation in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji
Author(s) Sacks, GaryORCID iD for Sacks, Gary orcid.org/0000-0001-9736-1539
Mialon, Melissa
Vandevijvere, Stefanie
Trevena, Helen
Snowdon, Wendy
Crino, Michelle
Swinburn, Boyd
Journal name Critical public health
Volume number 25
Issue number 3
Season Special Issue: “Big Food”: Critical perspectives on the global growth of the food and beverage industry. Guest editors: Simon N. Williams and Marion Nestle
Start page 299
End page 319
Total pages 21
Publisher Routledge
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2015
ISSN 0958-1596
1469-3682
Keyword(s) food industry
policy
food marketing
product reformulation
Summary Unhealthy food environments are known to be major drivers of diet-related non-communicable diseases globally, and there is an imperative for major food companies to be publicly accountable for their actions to improve the healthiness of food environments. This paper examines the prevalence of publicly available policies and commitments of major packaged food and soft drink manufacturers, and fast-food restaurants in Australia, New Zealand and Fiji with respect to reducing food marketing to children and product (re)formulation. In each country, the most prominent companies in each sector were selected. Company policies, commitments and relevant industry initiatives were gleaned from company and industry association websites. In Australia and New Zealand, there are a higher proportion of companies with publicly available marketing and formulation policies than in Fiji. However, even in Australia, a large proportion of the most prominent food companies do not have publicly available policies. Where they exist, policies on food marketing to children generally focus on those aged less than 12, do not apply to all types of media, marketing channels and techniques, and do not provide transparency with respect to the products to which the policies apply. Product formulation policies, where they exist, focus mostly on salt reduction and changes to the make-up of overall product portfolios, and do not generally address saturated fat, added sugar and energy reduction. In the absence of strong policies and corresponding actions by the private sector, it is likely that government action (e.g. through co-regulation or legislation) will be needed to drive improved company performance.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/09581596.2014.946888
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
HERDC collection year 2014
Copyright notice ©2014, Taylor & Francis
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066154

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: Population Health
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Created: Mon, 22 Sep 2014, 14:16:39 EST by Penny Andrews

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