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Intersections between disability, type of impairment, gender and socio-economic disadvantage in a nationally representative sample of 33,101 working aged Australians

Kavanagh, Anne M., Krnjacki, Lauren, Aitken, Zoe, LaMontagne, Anthony D., Beer, Andrew, Baker, Emma and Bentley, Rebecca 2015, Intersections between disability, type of impairment, gender and socio-economic disadvantage in a nationally representative sample of 33,101 working aged Australians, Disability and health journal, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 191-199, doi: 10.1016/j.dhjo.2014.08.008.

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Title Intersections between disability, type of impairment, gender and socio-economic disadvantage in a nationally representative sample of 33,101 working aged Australians
Author(s) Kavanagh, Anne M.
Krnjacki, Lauren
Aitken, Zoe
LaMontagne, Anthony D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Beer, Andrew
Baker, Emma
Bentley, Rebecca
Journal name Disability and health journal
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Start page 191
End page 199
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA
Publication date 2015-04
ISSN 1936-6574
Keyword(s) disability
impairment
disadvantage
gender
Summary Background:People with disabilities are socio-economically disadvantaged and have poorer health than people without disabilities; however, little is known about the way in which disadvantage is patterned by gender and type of impairment.Objectives:1. To describe whether socio-economic circumstances vary according to type of impairment (sensory and speech, intellectual, physical, psychological and acquired brain injury) 2. To compare levels of socio-economic disadvantage for women and men with the same impairment typeMethods:We used a large population-based disability-focused survey of Australians, analysing data from 33,101 participants aged 25 to 64. Indicators of socio-economic disadvantage included education, income, employment, housing vulnerability, and multiple disadvantage. Stratified by impairment type, we estimated: the population weighted prevalence of socio-economic disadvantage; the relative odds of disadvantage compared to people without disabilities; and the relative odds of disadvantage between women and men.Results:With few exceptions, people with disabilities fared worse for every indicator compared to people without disability; those with intellectual and psychological impairments and acquired brain injuries were most disadvantaged. While overall women with disabilities were more disadvantaged than men, the magnitude of the relative differences was lower than the same comparisons between women and men without disabilities, and there were few differences between women and men with the same impairment types.Conclusions:Crude comparisons between people with and without disabilities obscure how disadvantage is patterned according to impairment type and gender. The results emphasise the need to unpack how gender and disability intersect to shape socio-economic disadvantage.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.dhjo.2014.08.008
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066290

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Health and Social Development
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Created: Thu, 02 Oct 2014, 09:10:55 EST

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