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Cocaine use severity and cerebellar gray matter are associated with reversal learning deficits in cocaine-dependent individuals

Moreno-López, Laura, Perales, Jose C., van Son, Dana, Albein-Urios, Natalia, Soriano-Mas, Carles, Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose M., Wiers, Reinout W. and Verdejo-García, Antonio 2015, Cocaine use severity and cerebellar gray matter are associated with reversal learning deficits in cocaine-dependent individuals, Addiction biology, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 546-556, doi: 10.1111/adb.12143.

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Title Cocaine use severity and cerebellar gray matter are associated with reversal learning deficits in cocaine-dependent individuals
Author(s) Moreno-López, Laura
Perales, Jose C.
van Son, Dana
Albein-Urios, NataliaORCID iD for Albein-Urios, Natalia orcid.org/0000-0001-7841-018X
Soriano-Mas, Carles
Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose M.
Wiers, Reinout W.
Verdejo-García, Antonio
Journal name Addiction biology
Volume number 20
Issue number 3
Start page 546
End page 556
Total pages 11
Publisher Wiley
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2015-05
ISSN 1369-1600
Keyword(s) cerebellum
cocaine
inferior frontal gyrus
insula
reversal learning
Summary Cocaine addiction involves persistent deficits to unlearn previously rewarded response options, potentially due to neuroadaptations in learning-sensitive regions. Cocaine-targeted prefrontal systems have been consistently associated with reinforcement learning and reversal deficits, but more recent interspecies research has raised awareness about the contribution of the cerebellum to cocaine addiction and reversal. We aimed at investigating the link between cocaine use, reversal learning and prefrontal, insula and cerebellar gray matter in cocaine-dependent individuals (CDIs) varying on levels of cocaine exposure in comparison with healthy controls (HCs). Twenty CDIs and 21 HCs performed a probabilistic reversal learning task (PRLT) and were subsequently scanned in a 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. In the PRLT, subjects progressively learn to respond to one predominantly reinforced stimulus, and thenmust learn to respond according to the opposite, previously irrelevant, stimulus-reward pairing. Performance measureswere errors after reversal (reversal cost), and probability of maintaining response after errors. Voxel-based morphometry was conducted to investigate the association between gray matter volume in the regions of interest and cocaine use and PRLT performance. Severity of cocaine use correlated with gray matter volume reduction in the left cerebellum (lobule VIII), while greater reversal cost was correlated with gray matter volume reduction in a partially overlapping cluster (lobules VIIb and VIII). Right insula/inferior frontal gyrus correlated with probability of maintaining response after errors. Severity of cocaine use detrimentally impacted reversal learning and cerebellar gray matter.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/adb.12143
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Society for the Study of Addiction
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066320

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 02 Oct 2014, 09:18:22 EST

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