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The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: A latent class analysis

Albein-Urios, Natalia, Pilatti, Angelina, Lozano-Rojas, Oscar, Martínez-González, Jose M. and Verdejo-García, Antonio 2014, The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: A latent class analysis, Archives of clinical neuropsychology, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 38-46, doi: 10.1093/arclin/act072.

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Title The value of impulsivity to define subgroups of addicted individuals differing in personality dysfunction, craving, psychosocial adjustment, and wellbeing: A latent class analysis
Author(s) Albein-Urios, NataliaORCID iD for Albein-Urios, Natalia orcid.org/0000-0001-7841-018X
Pilatti, Angelina
Lozano-Rojas, Oscar
Martínez-González, Jose M.
Verdejo-García, Antonio
Journal name Archives of clinical neuropsychology
Volume number 29
Issue number 1
Start page 38
End page 46
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1873-5843
0887-6177
Keyword(s) addiction
personality and personality disorders
psychosocial functioning
quality of life
statistical methods
Summary High impulsivity is common to substance and gambling addictions. Despite these commonalities, there is still substantial heterogeneity on impulsivity levels within these diagnostic groups, and variations in impulsive levels predict higher severity of symptoms and poorer outcomes. We addressed the question of whether impulsivity scores can yield empirically driven subgroups of addicted individuals that will exhibit different clinical presentations and outcomes. We applied latent class analysis (LCA) to trait (UPPS-P impulsive behavior scale) and cognitive impulsivity (Stroop and d2 tests) scores in three predominantly male addiction diagnostic groups: Cocaine with Personality Disorders, Cocaine Non-comorbid, and Gambling and analyzed the usefulness of the resulting subgroups to differentiate personality beliefs and relevant outcomes: Craving, psychosocial adjustment, and quality of life. In accordance with impulsivity scores, the three addiction diagnostic groups are best represented as two separate classes: Class 1 characterized by greater trait impulsivity and poorer cognitive impulsivity performance and Class 2 characterized by lower trait impulsivity and better cognitive impulsivity performance. The two empirically derived classes showed significant differences on personality features and outcome variables (Class 1 exhibited greater personality dysfunction and worse clinical outcomes), whereas conventional diagnostic groups showed non-significant differences on most of these measures. Trait and cognitive impulsivity scores differentiate subgroups of addicted individuals with more versus less severe personality features and clinical outcomes.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/arclin/act072
Field of Research 179999 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, Oxford University Press
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066323

Document type: Journal Article
Collection: School of Psychology
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Created: Thu, 02 Oct 2014, 09:18:39 EST

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