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Review of guidelines for children's vision screenings

Hopkins, Shelley, Sampson, Geoff P., Hendicott, Peter and Wood, Joanne M. 2013, Review of guidelines for children's vision screenings, Clinical and experimental optometry, vol. 96, no. 5, pp. 443-449, doi: 10.1111/cxo.12029.

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Title Review of guidelines for children's vision screenings
Author(s) Hopkins, Shelley
Sampson, Geoff P.ORCID iD for Sampson, Geoff P. orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5691
Hendicott, Peter
Wood, Joanne M.
Journal name Clinical and experimental optometry
Volume number 96
Issue number 5
Start page 443
End page 449
Total pages 7
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publication date 2013-09
ISSN 0816-4622
Keyword(s) amblyopia
children's vision
refraction
strabismus
vision screening
Summary The aim of children's vision screenings is to detect visual problems that are common in this age category through valid and reliable tests. Nevertheless, the cost effectiveness of paediatric vision screenings, the nature of the tests included in the screening batteries and the ideal screening age has been the cause of much debate in Australia and worldwide. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to report on the current practice of children's vision screenings in Australia and other countries, as well as to evaluate the evidence for and against the provision of such screenings. This was undertaken through a detailed investigation of peer-reviewed publications on this topic. The current review demonstrates that there is no agreed vision screening protocol for children in Australia. This appears to be a result of the lack of strong evidence supporting the benefit of such screenings. While amblyopia, strabismus and, to a lesser extent refractive error, are targeted by many screening programs during pre-school and at school entry, there is less agreement regarding the value of screening for other visual conditions, such as binocular vision disorders, ocular health problems and refractive errors that are less likely to reduce distance visual acuity. In addition, in Australia, little agreement exists in the frequency and coverage of screening programs between states and territories and the screening programs that are offered are ad hoc and poorly documented. Australian children stand to benefit from improved cohesion and communication between jurisdictions and health professionals to enable an equitable provision of validated vision screening services that have the best chance of early detection and intervention for a range of paediatric visual problems.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/cxo.12029
Field of Research 119999 Medical and Health Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2008, Wiley-Blackwell
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066330

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.