You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Creatine supplementation during pregnancy: summary of experimental studies suggestion a treatment to improve fetal and neonatal morbidity and reduce mortality in high-risk human pregnancy

Dickinson, Hayley, Ellery, Stacey, Ireland, Zoe, LaRosa, Domenic, Snow, Rodney and Walker, David W 2014, Creatine supplementation during pregnancy: summary of experimental studies suggestion a treatment to improve fetal and neonatal morbidity and reduce mortality in high-risk human pregnancy, BMC pregnancy & childbirth, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-14-150.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
dickinson-creatinesupplementation-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 572.22KB 3

Title Creatine supplementation during pregnancy: summary of experimental studies suggestion a treatment to improve fetal and neonatal morbidity and reduce mortality in high-risk human pregnancy
Author(s) Dickinson, Hayley
Ellery, Stacey
Ireland, Zoe
LaRosa, Domenic
Snow, RodneyORCID iD for Snow, Rodney orcid.org/0000-0002-4796-6916
Walker, David W
Journal name BMC pregnancy & childbirth
Volume number 14
Issue number 1
Article ID 150
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2014-04-27
ISSN 1471-2393
Summary While the use of creatine in human pregnancy is yet to be fully evaluated, its long-term use in healthy adults appears to be safe, and its well documented neuroprotective properties have recently been extended by demonstrations that creatine improves cognitive function in normal and elderly people, and motor skills in sleep-deprived subjects. Creatine has many actions likely to benefit the fetus and newborn, because pregnancy is a state of heightened metabolic activity, and the placenta is a key source of free radicals of oxygen and nitrogen. The multiple benefits of supplementary creatine arise from the fact that the creatine-phosphocreatine [PCr] system has physiologically important roles that include maintenance of intracellular ATP and acid–base balance, post-ischaemic recovery of protein synthesis, cerebral vasodilation, antioxidant actions, and stabilisation of lipid membranes. In the brain, creatine not only reduces lipid peroxidation and improves cerebral perfusion, its interaction with the benzodiazepine site of the GABAA receptor is likely to counteract the effects of glutamate excitotoxicity – actions that may protect the preterm and term fetal brain from the effects of birth hypoxia. In this review we discuss the development of creatine synthesis during fetal life, the transfer of creatine from mother to fetus, and propose that creatine supplementation during pregnancy may have benefits for the fetus and neonate whenever oxidative stress or feto-placental hypoxia arise, as in cases of fetal growth restriction, premature birth, or when parturition is delayed or complicated by oxygen deprivation of the newborn.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-14-150
Field of Research 111401 Foetal Development and Medicine
Socio Economic Objective 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2014, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066406

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 20 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 171 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 09 Oct 2014, 14:49:31 EST by Jane Moschetti

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.