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Education and work in service of the nation: Canadian and Australian girls' fiction, 1908-1921

Moruzi, Kristine and Smith, Michelle J. 2014, Education and work in service of the nation: Canadian and Australian girls' fiction, 1908-1921. In Moruzi, Kristine and Smith, Michelle J. (ed), Colonial girlhood in literature, culture and history, 1840-1950, Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke, England, pp.180-194, doi: 10.1057/9781137356352.

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Title Education and work in service of the nation: Canadian and Australian girls' fiction, 1908-1921
Author(s) Moruzi, KristineORCID iD for Moruzi, Kristine orcid.org/0000-0002-2636-975X
Smith, Michelle J.
Title of book Colonial girlhood in literature, culture and history, 1840-1950
Editor(s) Moruzi, KristineORCID iD for Moruzi, Kristine orcid.org/0000-0002-2636-975X
Smith, Michelle J.
Publication date 2014
Series Palgrave studies in nineteenth-century writing and culture
Chapter number 13
Total chapters 16
Start page 180
End page 194
Total pages 15
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Place of Publication Basingstoke, England
Keyword(s) Australian literature
Canadian literature
girlhood
colonialism
employment
education
children's literature
Summary This chapter compares early twentieth-century Australian novels by Ethel Turner, Mary Grant Bruce, and Lilian Turner to Canadian novels by Nellie McClung and L.M. Montgomery to demonstrate important differences in attitudes towards education and work. Girls’ fiction in these white settler colonies has many similarities, containing strong ideals related to domesticity, education, employment, and femininity. In the Canadian fiction, attitudes towards women’s higher education and employement are generally much more positive. Although both Australian and Canadian girls’ fiction typically conclude with marriage, Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables and Nellie McClung’s Pearlie Watson are offered the opportunity to pursue higher education and use this education to teach others. In contrast, Lilian Turner’s Paradise and the Perrys, Ethel Turner’s Fair Ines, and Mary Grant Bruce’s ’Possum emphasise the importance of domesticity while also showing how girls sought to earn income without leaving home. Through our comparison of these Canadian and Australian novels, all published between 1908 and 1921, we demonstrate how the different feminine ideals embodied through these heroines are inevitably intertwined with the needs of the nation
ISBN 9781137356345
1137356340
Language eng
DOI 10.1057/9781137356352
Field of Research 200502 Australian Literature (excl Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Literature)
200506 North American Literature
Socio Economic Objective 970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
HERDC Research category B1 Book chapter
Copyright notice ©2014, Palgrave Macmillan
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30066560

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Created: Mon, 13 Oct 2014, 13:08:55 EST by Michelle Smith

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