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Developing an analytical framework to assess the uncertainty and flexibility mismatches across the supply chain

Fayezi, Sajad, Zutshi, Ambika and O'Loughlin, Andrew 2014, Developing an analytical framework to assess the uncertainty and flexibility mismatches across the supply chain, Business process management journal, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 362-391, doi: 10.1108/BPMJ-10-2012-0111.

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Title Developing an analytical framework to assess the uncertainty and flexibility mismatches across the supply chain
Author(s) Fayezi, Sajad
Zutshi, AmbikaORCID iD for Zutshi, Ambika orcid.org/0000-0002-0982-5303
O'Loughlin, Andrew
Journal name Business process management journal
Volume number 20
Issue number 3
Start page 362
End page 391
Total pages 30
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.
Place of publication Bingley, England
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1463-7154
Keyword(s) flexibility
flexibility gap
required/actual flexibility
supply chain
uncertainty
Summary Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how decisions regarding organisational flexibility can be improved through targeted resource allocation, by focusing on the supply chain's level of uncertainty exposure. Specifically, the issue of where and in what ways flexibility has been incorporated across the organisation's supply chain is addressed. Design/methodology/approach: A two-phase methodology design based on literature review and case study was used. Using 83 journal articles in the areas of uncertainty and flexibility an analytical process for assessing uncertainty-flexibility mismatches was developed. Furthermore, results from ten interviews with senior/middle managers within the Australian manufacturing sector were used to provide preliminary insights on the usefulness and importance of the analytical process and its relationship with organisational practice. Findings: The paper emphasises the importance of having a systematic and encompassing view of uncertainty-flexibility mismatches across the supply chain, as well as the significance of socio-technical engagement. The paper both conceptually and empirically illustrates how, using a structured analytical process, flexibility requirements across the supply, process, control and demand segments of a supply chain might be assessed. A four-step analytical process was accordingly developed and, its application, usefulness and importance discussed using empirical data. Practical implications: The analytical process presented in this paper can assist managers to obtain a comprehensive overview of supply chain flexibility when dealing with situations involving uncertainty. This can facilitate and improve their decision-making with respect to prioritising attention on identified flexibility gaps in order to ensure stability of their performance. Originality/value: The paper presents a supply chain-wide discussion on the difficulties that uncertainty brings to organisations, and how organisational flexibility might serve to moderate those challenges for supply chain management. It discusses how to identify the flexibility gap and proposes an original analytical process for systematic assessment of uncertainty-flexibility mismatches. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Language eng
DOI 10.1108/BPMJ-10-2012-0111
Field of Research 150309 Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Socio Economic Objective 970115 Expanding Knowledge in Commerce
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Emerald Group
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067179

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Management and Marketing
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.