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Atypical antipsychotic agents; peas in a pod or chalk and cheese?

Singh, A. B., Nierenberg, A. A., Yatham, L. N. and Berk, M. 2014, Atypical antipsychotic agents; peas in a pod or chalk and cheese?, BMC Medicine, vol. 12, no. 1, pp. 1-4, doi: 10.1186/s12916-014-0126-1.

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Title Atypical antipsychotic agents; peas in a pod or chalk and cheese?
Author(s) Singh, A. B.
Nierenberg, A. A.
Yatham, L. N.
Berk, M.ORCID iD for Berk, M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Journal name BMC Medicine
Volume number 12
Issue number 1
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, England
Publication date 2014-08
ISSN 1741-7015
Keyword(s) Atypical antipsychotics
Bipolar
Generic
Health economics
Risperidone
Schizophrenia
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER
GENERIC RISPERIDONE
BIPOLAR DEPRESSION
METAANALYSIS
MEDICATIONS
MONOTHERAPY
GUIDELINES
MANAGEMENT
EFFICACY
Summary With escalating health expenditure and a shrinking purse, there is increased focus on the cost efficacy of still patented versus generic medications in general, and for atypical antipsychotics in particular. In a recent BMC Medicine article, Godman and colleagues presented data indicating poor uptake of the off patent atypical antipsychotic risperidone, arguing for authorities to mandate its greater use. This is under the assumption of clinical equivalence of atypical antipsychotics. This commentary argues that there are clinically meaningful differences between atypical antipsychotics and important inter-individual heterogeneity in clinical response and tolerability. Access to a broad range of atypical antipsychotics enables clinicians to tailor care, taking consideration of differential efficacy and adverse effects profile in order to meet the needs of individual patients with improved real world effectiveness of treatment. Restriction of agent choice risks detracting from optimal clinical care, with possible poorer outcomes and greater costs of care. A balance between encouraging use of cheapest in class agent and allowing access to various atypical agents for tailored care is likely to produce optimal health outcomes.Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/98.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0126-1
Field of Research 110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2014, Biomed Central
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067195

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.