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Tobacco smoking predicts depression and poorer quality of life in heart disease

Stafford, Lesley, Berk, Michael and Jackson, Henry J. 2013, Tobacco smoking predicts depression and poorer quality of life in heart disease, BMC cardiovascular disorders, vol. 13, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1471-2261-13-35.

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Title Tobacco smoking predicts depression and poorer quality of life in heart disease
Author(s) Stafford, Lesley
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Jackson, Henry J.
Journal name BMC cardiovascular disorders
Volume number 13
Article ID 35
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2013-05-24
ISSN 1471-2261
Keyword(s) Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder, Major
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Diseases
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive Value of Tests
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Smoking
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
Coronary artery disease
Depression
Summary BACKGROUND: We report on the prospective association between smoking and depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD).
METHODS: Prospective study of 193 patients with assessment of depression occurring 3-, 6- and 9- months (T1, 2, and 3, respectively) following discharge from hospital for a cardiac event. HRQOL was assessed at T3. T1 depression was assessed by clinical interview; T2 and T3 depression was assessed by self-report. Smoking at time of cardiac event was assessed by self-report. Multivariate analyses controlled for known demographic, psychosocial and clinical correlates of depression.
RESULTS: Smoking at the time of index cardiac event increased the likelihood of being diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) at T1 by 4.30 [95% CI, 1.12-16.46; p < .05]. The likelihood of receiving a diagnosis of minor depression, dysthymia or MDD as a combined group was increased by 8.03 [95% CI, 2.35-27.46; p < .01]. Smoking did not reliably predict depression at T2 or T3 and did not reliably predict persistent depression. Smoking increased the likelihood of being classified as depressed according to study criteria at least once during the study period by 5.19 [95% CI, 1.51-17.82; p < .01]. Smoking independently predicted worse mental HRQOL.
CONCLUSIONS: The findings support a role for smoking as an independent predictor of depression in CAD patients, particularly in the first 3 months post-cardiac event. The well-established imperative to encourage smoking cessation in these patients is augmented and the findings may add to the evidence for smoking cessation campaigns in the primary prevention of depression.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1471-2261-13-35
Field of Research 110319 Psychiatry (incl Psychotherapy)
1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, Stafford et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067219

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.