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Associations between young children's perceived and actual ball skill competence and physical activity

Barnett, Lisa M., Ridgers, Nicola D. and Salmon, Jo 2015, Associations between young children's perceived and actual ball skill competence and physical activity, Journal of science and medicine in sport, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 167-171, doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.03.001.

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Title Associations between young children's perceived and actual ball skill competence and physical activity
Author(s) Barnett, Lisa M.
Ridgers, Nicola D.
Salmon, Jo
Journal name Journal of science and medicine in sport
Volume number 18
Issue number 2
Start page 167
End page 171
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2015-03
ISSN 1878-1861
Keyword(s) Manipulative skills
Object control skill
Physical activity
Physical self perception
Summary Objectives: The relationship between actual and perceived object control competence (ball skills) and the contribution to young children’s physical activity is not known.
Design: Cross sectional study.
Methods: The Test Gross Motor Development-2 assessed actual object control competence and a modified version of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance for Young Children assessed perceived object control competence. Moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity was measured via accelerometry. Three mixed regression models were performed: (i) object control competence as the predictor and the outcome as perceived object control, (ii) perceived object control competence as the predictor and the outcome moderate to vigorous physical activity and (iii) actual object control as the predictor and the outcome moderate to vigorous physical activity. Models adjusted for school clustering, monitor wear time, sex and age. Interactions between respective predictor variables and sex were performed if warranted. A total of 102 children (56% boys, 44% girls) aged 4–8 years (M 6.3, SD 0.92) completed assessments.
Results: Girls had lower perceived and actual object control competence and were less active than boys. Actual object control competence was positively associated with perceived object control competence (B = 0.11, t(96) = 2.25, p < 0.001, p = 0.027) and this relationship did not differ by sex (p = 0.449); however, neither actual (p = 0.092) nor perceived object control competence (p = 0.827) were associated with moderate to vigorous physical activity.
Discussion: Young children’s perceived ball skill abilities appear to relate to actual competence; however, these measures were not associated with physical activity. In older children, object control skill is associated with physical activity so targeting young children’s object control skills is an intervention priority.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.jsams.2014.03.001
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920501 Child Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID NHMRC 1013507
Copyright notice ©2015, Elsevier
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067227

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Created: Thu, 04 Dec 2014, 11:22:20 EST

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