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The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes

Gran, Petra and Cameron-Smith, David 2011, The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes, BMC physiology, vol. 11, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1186/1472-6793-11-10.

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Title The actions of exogenous leucine on mTOR signalling and amino acid transporters in human myotubes
Author(s) Gran, Petra
Cameron-Smith, David
Journal name BMC physiology
Volume number 11
Article ID 10
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2011-06-25
ISSN 1472-6793
Keyword(s) Adult
Amino Acid Transport Systems
Class III Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
Eukaryotic Initiation Factor-4G
Gene Expression Regulation
Humans
Insulin
Leucine
Male
Muscle Fibers, Skeletal
Organ Culture Techniques
Phosphorylation
Prokaryotic Initiation Factor-3
Protein Processing, Post-Translational
Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa
Signal Transduction
TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Young Adult
Summary BACKGROUND: The branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) leucine has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal muscle anabolism. Activation of anabolic signalling occurs via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through an undefined mechanism. System A and L solute carriers transport essential amino acids across plasma membranes; however it remains unknown whether an exogenous supply of leucine regulates their gene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute and chronic leucine stimulation of anabolic signalling and specific amino acid transporters, using cultured primary human skeletal muscle cells.
RESULTS: Human myotubes were treated with leucine, insulin or co-treated with leucine and insulin for 30 min, 3 h or 24 h. Activation of mTOR signalling kinases were examined, together with putative nutrient sensor human vacuolar protein sorting 34 (hVps34) and gene expression of selected amino acid transporters. Phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6K was transiently increased following leucine exposure, independently to insulin. hVps34 protein expression was also significantly increased. However, genes encoding amino acid transporters were differentially regulated by insulin and not leucine.
CONCLUSIONS: mTOR signalling is transiently activated by leucine within human myotubes independently of insulin stimulation. While this occurred in the absence of changes in gene expression of amino acid transporters, protein expression of hVps34 increased.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/1472-6793-11-10
Field of Research 110602 Exercise Physiology
0606 Physiology
1116 Medical Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 920409 Injury Control
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2011, Gran and Cameron-Smith
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30067232

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.